Course Listing

Italian Fall 2018

Italian (ITAL) Courses – Taught in Italian

ITAL 1010 – Elementary Italian I

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites:  No prior instruction in Italian. Students with previous experience in Italian must take the Italian placement exam (Date TBA). Students may not self-place in a language course.

Elementary Italian I is the first class in the four-course sequence that is necessary to complete the foreign language requirement. In this course, students will learn basic survival skills to assist them when they travel to Italy, however they will also learn to describe people and places, ask questions, narrate in the present and simple past tenses, as well as write short texts describing themselves, their families, and their impressions of Italy. Students will also develop their ability to understand spoken Italian by listening to songs, commercials, and movie clips, and they will begin reading advertisements, song lyrics, and some poems. Students of Elementary Italian will also have many occasions to learn more about life in contemporary Italy as they study the country’s language.

60% of this course will take place face to face during regularly scheduled class meetings on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, while 40% of the work must be completed online both through the Connect website and the students’ personal e-Portfolios. It is essential that students arrive to each class meeting having completed all of these assignments beforehand so that they may become more confident and competent speakers of Italian.

Much like learning to play a sport or a musical instrument, studying a foreign language requires constant practice. Therefore, all course activities will be conducted in Italian.

ITAL 2010 – Intermediate Italian I

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites: Passing grade in ITAL 1020 or department permission. Students may not self-place in a language course. Students who did not complete ITAL 1020 are required to take the Italian placement exam (Date TBA). All students will submit proof of placement by (Date TBA).

ITAL 2010 Intermediate Italian I is the third class in the four-course sequence which fulfills the language requirement. Students will further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills as well as deepen their cultural literacy in Italian. You will accomplish these goals with the guidance of your instructor, through review of grammar, short readings, compositions, and listening and speaking activities. Students will also have the opportunity to listen to songs, comment on works of art, watch commercials and short films, read newspaper articles, and meet natives of Italy in your quest to become more confident and competent users of the Italian language.

Much like learning to play a sport or a musical instrument, studying a foreign language requires constant practice. Therefore, all course activities will be conducted in Italian.

ITAL 3010 – Advanced Italian I with Sarah Annunziato

MoWeFr 11:00-11:50AM in Nau Hall 242

Prerequisite: ITAL 2020

This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the critical review, the persuasive essay, and the research paper.

Italian Fall 2018

Italian in Translation (ITTR) Courses – Taught in English

ITTR 3559 –  New Course: Italian in Translation “Narrating (Un-)sustainability: Ecocritical Explorations in Italy and the Mediterranean” with Enrico Cesaretti

TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in Nau Hall 242

This course focuses on the potential narratives have to convey messages that are relevant to our ethical and environmental awareness, and to stimulate critical strategies that encourage to imagine alternatives to existing systems of knowledge and distributions of power. As we shall expand the notion of ‘text’ to include all material formations (landscapes, bodies, matters), in the first half of this course, students will learn about the origins and general objectives of ecocriticism, and various approaches to the notion of sustainability. In the second section, taking the Italian/Mediterranean area as an interpretive, local key that may enlighten the situation of many other, global places, we shall travel up and down throughout the Italian peninsula, and encounter a selection of “material narratives” (i.e. the interlaced stories co-emerging simultaneously from places, literature, artworks, films and documentaries) which may contribute to shape our environmental consciousness, and affect our ethical attitude in the era of the Anthropocene.

ITTR 3559 (Cross-listed with WGS 3559) – New Course in Italian Translation “Italy on Screen: Sex, Gender and Racial Identities in the Global Context” with Francesca Calamita

MoWe 3:30-4:45PM in Nau Hall 142

This course considers representations of sex, gender and racial identities in Italian films, television, advertisements and other forms of visual culture. With a focus on the contemporary Italian context, students will explore issues of intersectionality from a global perspective. An intersectional feminist approach will frame class discussion, where, Italian society and its culture will be read through a perspective that emphasizes the interconnectedness between gender, race, sexual orientation, religion, disability, social class and immigration status, among other layers of identity. Lectures will offer a close reading of both critically acclaimed and more mainstream works, trying to answer the following question: what can Italian cinema, television and advertising tell us about diversity and inclusion in the worldwide context?

ITTR 4820 – Italian Pop Culture from the 1960s to the Present with Enrico Cesaretti

TuTh 11:00-12:15PM in Nau Hall 242

This course examines, from a cultural/historical perspective, the social, economic, and political transformations that took place in Italy during its recent history, from the post WWII “miracle years” of the industrial boom in the late 50s and 60s, until today’s struggles with the multifaceted dynamics of globalization. By discussing different cultural artifacts and media (film, literature, music, advertisements, comic books) in the period under consideration, together with a selection of relevant critical essays, we shall investigate not only how the (popular) arts reflected, supported, resisted and, in general, commented upon such transformations, but also their frequent dialogues and exchanges with American culture.

Portuguese Fall 2018

Portuguese (PORT) Courses – Taught in Portuguese

PORT 1110 – Beginning Intensive Portuguese with Lilian Feitosa

  • Section 001 MoWeFr 11:00-11:50AM in The Rotunda Room 150
  • Section 002 MoWeFr 1:00-1:50PM in New CAB 115

Prerequisite: Completion of FREN 2020 or SPAN 2020, or instructor permission.

Introduces speaking, understanding, reading and writing Portuguese, especially as used in Brazil. Five class hours and one laboratory hour. Followed by PORT 2120. 

PORT 3010 – Advanced Grammar, Conversation and Composition with Lilian Feitosa

MoWeFr 12:00-12:50PM in The Rotunda Room 150

Studies advanced grammar through analysis of written and audiovisual texts; includes extensive practice in composition and topical conversation.

Portuguese Fall 2018

Portuguese in Translation (POTR) – Taught in English

POTR 4260 (Cross-listed with MDST 4559) – Brazilian Media with Eli Carter

Mo 5:00-7:30PM in New CAB 183

The objective of this course is to examine the development of Brazilian television from its origins in 1950 to modern-day broadcast television, Pay TV, and Internet programming.  To this end, the course will focus on key policies and players—networks, screenwriters, directors, and independent production companies—formats, different modes of production, and financing mechanisms.  Much of the discussion and analysis will revolve around a selection of contemporary works that, in contrast to the traditionally dominant telenovela, have emerged as a result of Brazilian television’s slow transition out of the network era and into one characterized by an increase in viewing options.

POTR 7559 New Course in Portuguese Translation with Eli Carter

We 3:30-6:00PM New CAB 111

The objective of this course is to explore Brazilian audiovisual production from the 1950s to present-day film, broadcast television, Pay-TV, and Internet content. To this end, through the lens of important theoretical concepts and critical debates, the course will focus on key policies and players, formats, different modes of production, and financing mechanisms. Much of our discussion and analysis will revolve around a selection of contemporary works (from television and the Internet) that, in contrast to the traditionally dominant telenovela, have emerged as a result of Brazilian media’s slow transition out of the network era and into one characterized by technological advancements and increased viewing options. 

Spanish Fall 2018

Spanish (SPAN) Courses – Taught in Spanish

SPAN 1010 – Elementary Spanish

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

No previous formal instruction in Spanish, or an SAT II score less than 410. SPAN 1010 is for true beginners only. Students with prior experience with Spanish must take the UVA Spanish placement exam. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by (Date TBA).

Elementary Spanish is a four-credit introductory level hybrid course for true beginners designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities on Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 1060 – Accelerated Elementary Spanish

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites: Placement score of 420-510 on the SAT II Exam or a score of 0-325 on the UVA Placement Exam. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by (Date TBA).

Accelerated Elementary Spanish a four-credit accelerated introductory level hybrid course designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities with Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2010 – Intermediate Spanish 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: SPAN 1020, SPAN 1060, or SAT II score of 520-590, or Placement Test score of 326-409. Students may not self-place in a language course.  All students will submit proof of placement by (Date TBA).

Intermediate Spanish is a three-credit intermediate level course, the third course in a four-course sequence, which fulfills the language requirement.  The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2020 – Advanced Intermediate Spanish 

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites: Spanish 2010, SAT II Test score of 600-640, or UVA Placement Test score of 410-535. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by (Date TBA).

Advanced Intermediate Spanish is a three credit intermediate level course, the fourth course in a four-course sequence which fulfills the language requirement. The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 3000 – Phonetics with Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

MoWe 3:30-4:45PM in New CAB 207

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent.

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student's pronunciation.

SPAN 3010 – Grammar and Composition I 

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisite: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent); or UVA placement test score of 536-650; or AP score of 4; or SAT II score of 641-700; or IB Spanish (High) score of 7.

This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the critical review, the persuasive essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3020 – Grammar and Composition II 

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent) AND either of the following: a UVA placement test score of 651+; an AP score of 5; an SAT II score of 701-800; an IB Spanish A1 or A2 score of 5, 6 or 7.

This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the comparative essay, the argumentative essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3030 – Cultural Conversations

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisite: SPAN3010 or the equivalent level of Spanish, in which case students will need to speak with the instructor ahead of time for permission to take the course.

Conversation course devoted to different aspects of Spanish, Spanish American, or Latino culture. Student-led discussion of materials ranging from films and music videos to radio programs, newspapers, and the Internet.   

SPAN 3040 – Business Spanish with Paula Sprague 

  • Section 001  MoWeFr 10:00-10:50PM in New CAB 191 
  • Section 002  MoWeFr 11:00-11:50PM in New CAB 191

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 3050 – Spanish for Medical Professionals with Alicia Lopez Operé

  • Section 001  TuTh 11:00-12:15PM in Minor Hall 130  
  • Section 002  TuTh 9:30-10:45AM in Minor Hall 130  

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

This course is designed for students planning to work in the health care field and who want to develop fundamental written and oral skills and vocabulary for the assessment of Spanish speaking patients in a variety of settings. Students will gain familiarity with non-technical and semi-technical functional vocabulary, along with idiomatic expressions and situational phrases that are used in medical Spanish.

SPAN 3300 – Texts and Interpretation 

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement. (Note: SPAN 3300 or instructor permission is prerequisite for any course in Spanish literature or culture with a number above SPAN 3300.)

In this course we will be covering a variety of basic approaches to literary texts that enable us to analyze and understand them better. The course will be organized on the basis of literary genre (narrative, theater, poetry, etc.), with a portion of the semester dedicated to each. Short texts in Spanish for readings will be drawn from both Spanish and Latin American literature, and from a range of time periods.

SPAN 3400 – Survey of Spanish Literature l (Middle Ages to 1700) with E. Michael Gerli

MoWe 12:00-1:15PM in New CAB 395

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement.

El curso comprende una  introducción a la literatura castellana de la Edad Media, el renacimiento, y el barroco hasta 1680. Las obras se estudiarán en su contexto histórico-cultural. Además de intentar de estimular un aprecio por algunas obras maestras de estos períodos, el curso intentará dar a conocer el marco histórico-intelectual de varios aspectos de la cultura peninsular.

SPAN 3410 – Survey of Spanish Literature l (Middle Ages to 1700) with Anthony Pasero-O'Malley

MoWeFr 2:00-2:50PM in New CAB 291

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement.

This class introduces students of Spanish to foundational and representative texts from the 1700s through to the twenty-first century. Texts and authors are drawn from the various genres of poetry, prose, and drama, and will be explored alongside both the relevant literary movements and cultural and historical events with which they engage.

SPAN 3420 – Survey of Latin American Literature I (Colonial to 1900) with Fernando Operé

MoWe 3:30-4:45PM in New CAB 332

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement.

This is a survey course of Latin American Literature to introduce students to the major authors, and literary movements of Latin American literature from the discovery in 1492 up to 1900.  Students will read and discuss selections of works from accounts of the conquest, colonial period and 19th century, studying its historical and literary importance. Some authors include: Columbus, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, José María de Heredia, Esteban Echeverría, Ricardo Palma, José Martí y Rubén Dario among others.

SPAN 3430 – Survey of Latin American Literature II (1900 to Present) with Anne Garland Mahler and Gustavo Pellón

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement.

  • Section 001 – TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in New CAB 032 with Anne Garland Mahler

Spanish 3430 provides students with a survey of Latin American literature and the context in which it has developed from 1900 to the present. Students will leave this course with a general understanding of the region’s major literary trends, including their social and political dimensions. “Literature,” in this course, refers to literary texts (novels, stories, essays, poems), as well as visual art, films, and song lyrics. Throughout the course, we will consider the following questions: How has Latin America’s cultural production shaped and been shaped by its cultures, peoples, and historical events? How do the consciousness, memory, and imagination expressed within the region’s literature both reflect and create the region’s realities? And perhaps most importantly, who has (and has not) had access to Latin America’s literature and how has that shaped the way the region has represented itself through both the written word and image?

  • Section 003 –  MoWeFr 11:00-11:50AM in New CAB 338 with Gustavo Pellón

Spanish 3300 Texts and Interpretation es un requisito para este curso. Si eres Spanish major y estás en tu cuarto año no debes estar en un curso panorámico. Hay algunas excepciones. En caso de duda habla conmigo.

Este curso ofrece un panorama de la literatura hispanoamericana moderna. El curso tiene como meta exponer al estudiante a los autores, obras, y movimientos literarios principales de Hispanoamérica desde fines del siglo XIX a nuestros día. Vamos a leer poemas y selecciones breves de prosa en la antología Letras de Hispanomérica y además la novela Boquitas pintadas de Manuel Puig.

SPAN 4040 – Translation from Spanish to English 

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 4319 – Borges with Gustavo Pellón  

MoWeFr 12:00-12:50PM in New CAB 338

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Latin American literature requirement (SPAN 3430).

Spanish 3300 Texts and Interpretation y uno de los cursos panorámicos (Span 3400, 3410, 3420, 3430-) son requisitos para este curso. 

Este curso se propone estudiar la obra de Jorge Luis Borges con énfasis en sus cuentos, sin excluir algunos ensayos y poemas.   El curso examinará la obra de Borges desde la perspectiva de la literatura comparada y a Borges como lector y escritor de literatura mundial. 

Lecturas:

Ficciones (1944)

El Aleph (1949)

El informe de Brodie (1970)

Poesía completa.

Textos en Collab.

SPAN 4413 – Modern Spanish Literature with Samuel Amago     

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in New CAB 141

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.

This advanced course for Spanish Majors offers a critical examination of current trends in Spanish narrative fiction and comics. We will read and discuss long-form narratives published in Spain from the 1990s to the present by some of the country’s most important storytellers.

Texts:

Laforet, Carmen. Nada (1945)

Rodoreda, Mercè. La plaza del Diamante (1960)

Montero, Rosa. La hija del caníbal (1997)

Roca, Paco. Surcos del azar (2013) [ISBN: 978-84-15685-36-4]

Rosa, Isaac. Aquí vivió (2016) [ISBN: 978-84-15594-74-1]

SPAN 4420 – Spanish Contemporary Poetry  

TuTh 11:00-12:15AM in Gilmer Hall 225

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.

SPAN 4500 – Special Topics Literature Seminar: “Spanish Narrative & the Civil War” with Andrew Anderson

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in Wilson Hall 214

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Spanish literature requirement (SPAN 3410).

Primary texts will be Spanish novellas and novels that focus on different aspects of the Spanish Civil War: its causes, the experience of war, and the aftermath.  They will be drawn both from writers working in Spain and others in exile.  Objectives are an understanding of the historical events and an exploration of how these texts utilize a range of different narrative strategies adopted by novelists in the second half of the twentieth century.  We will also watch two movie adaptions of some of the texts.

SPAN 4510 – Special Topics Seminar: “21st-Century Spanish Theatre, Staging, and Performance” with Anthony Pasero-O'Malley

MoWeFr 12:00-12:50PM in Cocke Hall 115

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

This course introduces a corpus of plays from Spain written after and including the year 2000 with the objective of promoting understanding and analysis of the current trends, issues, and concerns in Spanish theatre. The course examines the relationship of these plays to contemporary cultural, economic, and aesthetic developments while at the same time integrating theoretical and cultural texts as accompanying materials. Issues and topics examined throughout the semester include: the impact and perceptions of immigration, the role and influence of modern forms of technology in society, the reception and staging of historical events, and the complex nature of interpersonal and familial relationships. This course likewise incorporates the nature and conditions of theatrical staging and production in order to better understand the relationship and transition from page to stage.

SPAN 4520 – Special Topics Culture & Civ Seminar: “Spain, the Pacific and Asia, 1500-1700” with Ricardo Padrón

TuTh 11:00-12:15PM in New CAB 207

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

Cristóbal Colón navegó hacia el oeste intentando llegar al Oriente, pero se topó con un Nuevo Mundo. Aunque muchos españoles se dedicaron a aprovechar las oportunidades presentadas por este descubrimiento, otros seguían interesados en hallar una ruta que atravesara o diera la vuelta al continente americano y así llegará a las Indias que Colón había querido alcanzar.  El esfuerzo culminó en la conquista de las Islas Filipinas en 1565-70, la cual dio lugar a una nueva fase imperialista orientada hacia la China, Japón, y otros sitios asiáticos. Este curso sirve como introducción a esta dimensión tan poco conocida del expansionismo español, usando textos de la época junto con fuentes secundarias modernas.  El tema nos permite reflexionar sobre las dimensiones globales de la cultura temprana moderna española

Pre-requisito: un curso “survey” en el program de español.  Este curso cuenta como un curso de cultura & civilización para los propósitos de la especialización en español.

SPAN 4530 – Spanish vis-à-vis Other Romance Languages with Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

MoWe 2:00-3:15PM in New CAB 207

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 and 3010, or 3000 and 3010, or departmental placement.

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 4700 – Spanish Culture and Civilization with Fernando Operé

MoWe 5:00-6:15PM in Cocke Hall 115

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.

This course deals with Spain in the 20th and 21st centuries.  It will begin with the most important political events since 1900 (end of the Monarchy of Alfonso XIII, the 2nd Republic, Spanish Civil War, Franco Dictatorship), up to the present political events of modern Spain ruled by a parliament under a monarchy, and integrated into the European Community.  Special emphasis will be put in understanding Spain in its complexity, social composition and decomposition, fiestas, and the main social changes of the Spanish society after the death of Franco in 1975 (immigration, nationalism).  Part of the course will be dedicated to the study of the Spanish artistic movements and its most relevant contemporary representatives in the field of music (flamenco and popular), painting (Dalí, Picasso, Sorolla), architecture (Gaudí, Calatrava), dance.

SPAN 4711 – 1492 and the Aftermath with Ricardo Padrón

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in Ruffner Hall 139

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.

En este curso nos acercaremos a la historia del encuentro entre España y el Nuevo Mundo que empezó con el viaje de Cristóbal Colón en 1492 mediante los relatos de los participantes mismos, o de otro escritores del mismo período.  Nuestro propósito no será la mera reconstrucción de la realidad histórica a través de estos textos necesariamente parciales, sino el análisis de las maneras en que la cultura y la ideología inevitablemente dan forma y sentido al relato histórico.  Leeremos textos escritos por españoles junto con otros elaborados por mestizos.  

Pre-requisito: un curso “survey” en el program de español.  Este curso cuenta como un curso de cultura & civilización para los propósitos de la especialización en español.

Spanish Fall 2018

Graduate Courses

SPAN 5650 – Realism and Generation of 1898 with Samuel Amago

Tu 3:30-6:00PM in New CAB 036

Graduate seminar on trends in modern Spanish narrative fiction from the late nineteenth century to the early twentieth centuries, centering on key texts selected from the MA reading list. In addition to conducting a critical survey of the central narrative, aesthetic and cultural contexts from which these literary texts emerge, we will also discuss publishing and teaching in Modern Spanish Studies.

Course objectives:

The principal objective of this course is not to impart information to the student, but to develop his or her skills as a reader and critic of Spanish narrative fiction and to begin to explore strategies for success in the profession. Through their work this semester, students can expect to achieve:

1. a working knowledge of critical and theoretical tendencies in Modern Spanish Studies,

2. a more sophisticated grasp of the principles of literary analysis and key concepts of narrative and cultural theory,

3. an understanding of research methods and practice in Hispanic Studies.

Novels:

Caballero, Fernán. La gaviota (1849)

Alas “Clarín,” Leopoldo. La Regenta (1884-85)

Baroja, Pío. Camino de perfección (1901)

Unamuno, Miguel de. Niebla (1907)

Laforet, Carmen. Nada (1945)

Rodoreda, Mercè. La plaza del Diamante (1960)

SPAN 7220 – History of the Language with Joel Rini

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in New CAB 594

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 7559 – New Course in Spanish "Spanish Poets & Poetry" with Fernando Valverde, Distinguished Visiting Professor

Tu 5:00-7:30PM in New CAB 183

An overview of contemporary poetry of the Spanish-speaking world – Spain, Spanish America, and Spanish writers in the US. Students. Engagement in close reading and discussion/interpretation of poems; students are also introduced to translation as a means of approaching poetry for gaining a deeper understanding of the vocabulary, syntax and images employed. Includes visits to class by poets.

SPAN 7850 – Themes and Genres “Don Quijote” with E. Michael Gerli

Mo 3:30-6:00PM in Wilson Hall 244

The course seeks to undertake a detailed reading of Don Quijote from a theoretical and historical perspective in order to explore its pivotal role in the development of the novel. Special consideration is given to Renaissance literary theory, particularly the commentaries on Aristotle's Poetics and the humanistic polemics on mimesis (imitation and the problem of the emulation of reality and truth in artifice), plus the history and reception of romance in Europe in the century prior to the publication of Don Quijote in 1605. Close attention is paid to the interaction of Renaissance literary theory and moral philosophy in Don Quijote. The course will also introduce the student to the notion of Humanism, while seeking to present the major research sources in Spanish literature. In addition to looking back at the theoretical foundations of Don Quijote, we will also address its subsequent impact upon the later European novel. We will, in short, deal with the problematic of the rise of the realist novel.

SPAN 8210 – Teaching Foreign Languages with Emily Scida

TuTh 11:00-12:15PM in New CAB 064

Please director inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 8560 –Seminars: Spanish America Modern Period “The Black Radical Tradition in Latin America” with Anne Garland Mahler

Tu 3:30-6:00PM in Wilson Hall 238

This course will engage the extensive body of critical work and literature on black radicalism in the American hemisphere. From the Haitian Revolution, Aponte rebellion, and independence wars, to communist internationalism and Garveyism, to civil rights and Black Power, to the contemporary Black Lives Matter movements, the history of the American hemisphere is largely defined through its history of black radical thought and black activism. Yet in the proliferation of scholarship on these subjects, the contributions of Afro-Latin American activists and intellectuals are often elided. This course will thus focus on the tradition of black radicalism among Afro-Latin Americans, situating the interventions of these intellectuals within their hemispheric and global milieus. Primary texts for this course will range from poetry, memoir, novels, film, political ephemera, and hip hop. These texts will be accompanied by a substantial historical and critical scholarly bibliography.

Authors include:

George Reid Andrews, Amiri Baracka, Miguel Barnet, Devyn Spence Benson, Aimé Césaire, Walterio Carbonell, Alejandro de la Fuente, María de los Reyes Castillo Bueno, Daisy Rubiera Castillo and Inés María Martiatu, W.E.B. Du Bois, Jihan El Tahri, Frantz Fanon, Ada Ferrer, Juan Flores, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Glenda Gilmore, Nicolás Guillén, Frank Andre Guridy, C.L.R. James, Miriam Jiménez-Román, Sandalio Junco, Vera Kutzinski, William Luis, Antonio Maceo, Carlos Moore, Robin Moore, Regino Pedroso, Pedro Pietri, Gloria Rolando, Margaret Stevens, Michelle Ann Stephens, Roberto Zurbano Torres, Michel Rolph-Trouillot, Mark A. Sanders, among others.

K’iche’ Fall 2018

Maya K’iche’ (KICH) Courses

KICH 1010 – Introduction to Maya K’iche’ I  with Maria Esther Poveda Moreno

TuTh 4:00-5:15PM in Clemons Library 320

KICH 2010 – Intermediate Maya K’iche’ I  with Maria Esther Poveda Moreno

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in Clemons Library 320