Course Listing

Italian Spring 2020

Italian (ITAL) Courses – Taught in Italian

ITAL 1020 – Elementary Italian II

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Elementary Italian II is the second class in the four-course sequence that is necessary to complete the foreign language requirement. In this course, students will learn to narrate in all tenses of the indicative, express opinions, make hypotheses, and give orders. They will improve their writing skills by producing a number of original texts, including blog posts, essays, and articles. Students will also develop their ability to understand spoken Italian by listening to songs, commercials, and movie clips, and they will read and study song lyrics, newspaper headlines, poems, and some short stories. Students of Elementary Italian II will also have many occasions to learn more about life in contemporary Italy as they study the country’s language.

60% of this course will take place face to face during regularly scheduled class meetings on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, while 40% of the work must be completed online both through the Connect website and the students’ personal e-Portfolios.

Much like learning to play a sport or a musical instrument, studying a foreign language requires constant practice. Therefore, all course activities will be conducted in Italian.

ITAL 2020 – Intermediate Italian II

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

ITAL 2020 Intermediate Italian II is the fourth class in the four-course sequence which fulfills the language requirement. In this course, students will further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills as well as deepen their cultural literacy in Italian. You will accomplish these goals with the guidance of your instructor, through review of grammar, short readings, compositions, and listening and speaking activities. Students will also have the opportunity to listen to songs, comment on works of art, watch commercials and short films, read and write newspaper articles, analyze how the Italian language reflects the movement towards gender parity, and meet natives of Italy in your quest to become more confident and competent users of the Italian language.

Much like learning to play a sport or a musical instrument, studying a foreign language requires constant practice. Therefore, all course activities will be conducted in Italian.

ITAL 2030 – Intermediate Italian for Professionals with Francesca Calamita

MoWeFr 1:00-1:50AM in New Cabell Hall 383

Italian society is changing and Italian language dynamically reflects these fluctuations and vice versa. This is the fourth class in the four-course sequence that fulfills the language requirement with special modules on issues of diversity and inclusion applicable to the work context. Especially designed for students interested in Italian Studies and Communication, Politics, International Relationships, Women, Gender and Sexuality as well as Psychology, but not limited to these disciplines, this class offers the opportunity to learn how to use Italian language in work environments where interculturalism, crossculturalism and multiculturalism are required. Present-day films, TV series episodes and articles from Italian newspapers will help students to learn more about the Italian society of the new millennium and strengthen their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at upper intermediate level. 

ITAL 2030 – Intermidiate Italian II for Professionals with Stella Mattioli

MoWeFr 2:00PM-2:50 in Gibson 141

Prerequisite: ITAL 2020

Italian 2030 For Professional” is a 2020 Italian course designed especially for students who would like to learn the vocabulary, the grammar and the cultural and legislative notions that are fundamental to live and work in Italy (or with Italian companies).

The idea for this course stems from the fact that different Italian students at UVa, over the years, have started working for Italian culinary and wine companies; of for American food companies with strong ties to Italy.

Students in this course will follow the program of Italian 2020, but with a special focus on food and culinary culture. In order to enroll, you need to have passed Italian 2010.

ITAL 3020 – Advanced Italian II with Francesca Calamita

TuH 2:00PM-3:15PM  in Nau Hall 242

ITAL3020 is a 300-level class aimed at advancing students’ language skills. Emphasis is placed on conversation, as well as composition and vocabulary. Students attending this class will deepen their knowledge of Italian culture and society, with a special focus on socio-cultural debates concerning politics, migration and gender issues. This course is designed with a series of activities focused on experiential learning to achieve fluency in Italian through real-life situations. The activities include (but are not limited to):sport days at UVa facilities; teaching a class for the community and for the lower level students of other languages; grocery shopping/eating at an Italian business in Charlottesville; tour guiding the Lawnand UVa in Italian; guiding a cineforum; tutoring clinic for lower class students and more.Italian women’s writing, LGBTQ cinema and globally acclaimed TVseries, such as My Brilliant Friend (Rai-HBO)will be read/watched over the course of the semester.

ITAL 3559 – Neorealism around the World: Italy and Global Film with Sarah Annunziato

MoWeFr 12:0012:50pm

Following World War II, Italian filmmakers developed a new style of story-telling that focused on marginalized people, drew attention to social ills, and emphasized stark realism. Later film critics would refer to this as Neorealism.  The movement’s roots stretched back into 19th-century Italian literature, and would eventually spread into cinematic traditions around the world.

 Students of this course will begin by studying Verismo, the literary movement that gave rise to Neorealism, and then learn how this earlier development eventually inspired a new style of filmmaking in the mid-twentieth century. You will also examine the characteristics of Neorealism, and then explore the vast influence it wielded, and continues to wield, over successive generations of filmmakers from around the world.

 Films to include: È piccerella, Ossessione, Roma, Città Aperta, Sciuscià, Ladri di biciclette, Riso Amaro, Miracolo a Milano, Les quatre cent coups, Raging Bull, 3-Iron, La noire de, Moonlight, and Roma.

 

Italian Spring 2020

Italian in Translation (ITTR) Courses – Taught in English

ITTR 3280– Michelangelo: The Artist, The Man, and His World

MoWe 2:00PM-3:15PM in New Cabell Hall 303

Currently Listed as ITTR 3559. Michelangelo’s name conjures genius and a nearly superhuman achievement in the arts. Contemporaries elevated him as the supreme sculptor, painter and architect of the age. His work offers a window on a deeply personal vision and rich artistic culture. Michelangelo’s creativity extends to many media—sculpture, painting, architecture, and writing in poetry and prose. This course focuses on all these pursuits. The course is not only about the extraordinary achievements of this Renaissance luminary but the ways in which we can analyze and compare visual and written works. We will examine closely the artist’s poems and letters, contemporary assessments of his artistic achievements, critical articles, and recent digital projects involving his work. Through an analysis of a wide range of contemporary digital projects we will explore how audiences today adapt earlier masterpieces for audiences today. This course is intended to enhance students’ skills in analyzing visual and literary artefacts. This skill is crucial in our media age which relies increasingly on visual messages and the interplay of text and image.

ITTR 5250 - Dante’s Purgatory in Translation

W 4:00pm-6:00PM in New Cabell Hall 303

This course focuses on Dante’s Purgatory, the realm of the saved, and the second canticle of the Divine Comedy. It introduces readers to a wondrous light and song-filled world. Each class will be a devoted to a close reading and discussion of themes, among them the treatment of political corruption, free will, source of evil in the universe, the relationship between church and state, and the role of liturgy and prayer in the path to salvation. We will also explore artistic treatments of Purgatory and the use of music in this realm. The course is intended for undergraduate and graduate with knowledge of the Inferno. 

 

Portuguese Spring 2020

Portuguese in Translation (POTR) Courses – Taught in English

POTR 4559 Streaming the Americas—Internet-Distributed Television in the American Hemisphere with Eli Carter

W 5:00-7:30pm in Dell 2 010 

The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive understanding of streaming services and their widespread impact on the mediascapes and social imaginaries of North, Central, and South America. Employing a hemispheric approach, Streaming the Americas contemplates and probes the recent rise of Internet portals, VOD, and SVOD services and the varied practices and incipient norms associated with these. Streaming the Americas will be organized around three broad points of articulation: legislation and production, aesthetics and representation, and reception. The intranational, transnational, and multidisciplinary approaches that make up the different sections will provide the student with a unique, comparative, and wide-ranging understanding of streaming in the American hemisphere.

 

 

Portuguese Spring 2020

Portuguese (PORT) Courses – Taught in Portuguese

PORT 2050 – Intensive Portuguese for Speakers of Spanish and other Romance Languages with Lilian Feitosa

MoWeFr 1:00-1:50PM in New Cabell Hall 328

This is an accelerated Portuguese language and culture course.

 

PORT 2120 – Intermediate Intensive Portuguese with Lilian Feitosa

Section 001 MoWeFr 11:00-11:50AM in New Cabell Hall 283

Section 002 MoWeFr 12:00-12:50PM in New Cabell Hall 283

Prerequisite: Completion of FREN 2020 or SPAN 2020, or instructor permission.

Introduces speaking, understanding, reading and writing Portuguese, especially as used in Brazil. Five class hours and one laboratory hour. Followed by PORT 2120. 

 

Spanish Spring 2020

Spanish (SPAN) Courses – Taught in Spanish


SPAN 1020 – Elementary Spanish

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites:  Passing grade in SPAN 1010. SPAN 1020 is for true beginners only. Students with prior experience with Spanish in high school must take the UVA Spanish placement exam. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by TBA (MWF sections) and TBA (TuTh sections).

Elementary Spanish (SPAN 1020) is a four-credit introductory level hybrid course for true beginners designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities on Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 1060 – Accelerated Elementary Spanish

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: Placement score of 420-510 on the SAT II Exam or a score of 0-325 on the UVA Placement Exam. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by TBA (MWF sections) and TBA (TuTh sections).

Accelerated Elementary Spanish a four-credit accelerated introductory level hybrid course designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities with Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2010 – Intermediate Spanish 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: SPAN 1020, SPAN 1060, or SAT II score of 520-590, or Placement Test score of 326-409. Students may not self-place in a language course.  All students will submit proof of placement by TBA (MWF sections) and TBA (TuTh sections).

Intermediate Spanish is a three-credit intermediate level course, the third course in a four-course sequence, which fulfills the language requirement.  The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2020 – Advanced Intermediate Spanish 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: Spanish 2010, SAT II Test score of 600-640, or UVA Placement Test score of 410-535. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by TBA (MWF sections) and TBA (TuTh sections).

Advanced Intermediate Spanish is a three credit intermediate level course, the fourth course in a four-course sequence which fulfills the language requirement. The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 3000 – Phonetics with Emily Scida

T/TH 11:00-12:15pm in New Cabell 132

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent.

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student's pronunciation.

SPAN 3010 – Grammar and Composition I

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent); or UVA placement test score of 536-650; or AP score of 4; or SAT II score of 641-700; or IB Spanish (High) score of 7.

This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the critical review, the persuasive essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3020 – Grammar and Composition II 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent) AND either of the following: a UVA placement test score of 651+; an AP score of 5; an SAT II score of 701-800; an IB Spanish A1 or A2 score of 5, 6 or 7.

This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the comparative essay, the argumentative essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3030 – Cultural Conversations with Esther Poveda and Alison Posey

  • Section 001 M/W/F 9:00-9:50am in New Cabell Hall 064 with Esther Poveda
  • Section 002 M/W/F 10:00-10:50am in New Cabell Hall 415 with Alison Posey

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

Conversation course devoted to different aspects of Spanish, Spanish American, or Latino culture. Student-led discussion of materials ranging from films and music videos to radio programs, newspapers, and the Internet.    

SPAN 3040 – Business Spanish 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 3050 – Spanish for Medical Professionals with Alicia Lopez Operé

T/TH 2:00-3:15pm in New Cabell 044

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

This course is designed for students planning to work in the health care field and who want to develop fundamental written and oral skills and vocabulary for the assessment of Spanish speaking patients in a variety of settings. Students will gain familiarity with non-technical and semi-technical functional vocabulary, along with idiomatic expressions and situational phrases that are used in medical Spanish.

SPAN 3200 – Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics with Maria Isabel Richart Marset

T/TH 12:30-1:45pm in TBD

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

SPAN 3300 – Texts and Interpretation 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement. (Note: SPAN 3300 or instructor permission is prerequisite for any course in Spanish literature or culture with a number above SPAN 3300.)

In this course we will be covering a variety of basic approaches to literary texts that enable us to analyze and understand them better. The course will be organized on the basis of literary genre (narrative, theater, poetry, etc.), with a portion of the semester dedicated to each. Short texts in Spanish for readings will be drawn from both Spanish and Latin American literature, and from a range of time periods.

SPAN 3400 – Survey of Spanish Literature I (Middle Ages to 1700) with Crystal Chemris

T/TH 11:00-12:15pm in New Cabell Hall 338

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

Medieval and Renaissance literature may seem daunting, but actually the topics and works covered in this course are highly relevant to today's social and political crises and are also innovative aesthetically in their own time.  You will engage with foundational texts, many of which were underground critiques of church and state.  The Celestina, for example, is overtly about the world of prostitution intersecting the world of courtly love, but covertly it is a protest against the oppression of the conversos, Jews forcibly converted to Christianity.  Lazarillo de Tormes is the first picaresque novel, which develops in the context of debates about the urban poor, marking the beginnings of an early critique of an economic crisis which continues to this day in the specter of impoverished children begging in the streets of Latin America.  We read the religious poetry of the mystics as the beginnings of a new subjectivity.  We also read selections from the highly experimental Don Quixote, a novel in which the protagonist, a "loco," visits a printing press, the place of the character's birth, and consider its relationship to paintings of the period such as Velázquez's Las meninas, which depicts the artist in the process of creating the painting itself. In short, students will be guided through selections of classic texts of early Spanish literature with an eye towards developing skills in literary analysis.

SPAN 3410 – Survey of Spanish Literature II (1700 to Present) with Fernando Valverde Rodriguez

  • Section 001 M/W/F 12:00-12:50pm in New Cabell Hall 338
  • Section 002 M/W/F 1:00-1:50pm in New Cabell Hall 338

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

This course for advanced undergraduates represents a panoramic survey of the last two hundred years of Spanish peninsular culture. Over the course of the semester, we will explore representative literary movements of modern Spain, including Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, the Avant Garde, Modernism, and Postmodernism in terms of their historical, intellectual, artistic and cultural contexts.

SPAN 3430 – Survey of Latin American Literature II (1900 to Present) with Anne Garland Mahler

M/W 3:30-4:45pm in Wilson Hall 214

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement.

This course provides students with a survey of Latin American literature and the context in which it has developed from 1900 to the present. Students will leave this course with a general understanding of the region’s major literary trends, including their social and political dimensions. “Literature,” in this course, refers to a range of cultural production from literary texts (novels, stories, essays, poems) to visual art, film, and song lyrics. Throughout the course, we will consider the following questions: How has Latin America’s cultural production shaped and been shaped by its cultures, peoples, and historical events? How do the consciousness, memory, and imagination expressed within the region’s literature both reflect and create the region’s realities? And perhaps most importantly, who has (and has not) had access to Latin America’s literature and how has that shaped the way the region has represented itself through both the written word and image?

SPAN 4040 – Translation from Spanish to English with Catherine Addington

MoWeFr 11:00-11:50am in New Cabell Hall 309

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

Note: SPAN 4040 may be used to satisfy the Language or Literature course requirement.

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 4200 – History of the Language with David Korfhagen

  • Section 001 M/W/F 10:00-10:50am in New Cabell Hall 303
  • Section 002 M/W/F 11:00-11:50am in New Cabell Hall 303

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 and 3010, or 3000 and 3010, or departmental placement.

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 4320 – Contemporary Latin American Short Fictionwith Gustavo Pellón

TuTh 2:00-3:15pm  in Wilson 214

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

We will explore the great variety of the short story in Latin America during the twentieth century. Authors studied will include:  Quiroga, Borges, Rulfo, Cortázar, García Márquez,  Angelica Gorodischer, Mempo Giardinelli, Allende, Ferré and Clarice Lispector.

Texts:

Delmira Agustini.  Poesía completas.  Cátedra.

Alfonsina Storni.  Antología poética.  Losada.

Gabriela Mistral.  Desolación, Ternura, Tala, Lagar.  Porrúa.

SPAN 4413 – MODERN SPANISH LITERATURE with Andrew Anderson

T/TH 12:30-1:45 New Cabell Hall

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

This upper-level course will provide an in-depth survey of Spanish literature from the beginning of the twentieth-century through to close to the present day.  We will read examples of narrative, theatre, and poetry, observing how both themes and techniques evolve over the century

SPAN 4500 – Special Topics Literature Seminars with Charlotte Rogers and Andrew Anderson

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

  • Section 001 M/W 2:00-3:15PM in Ruffner Hall 177 with Charlotte Rogers

Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Spanish literature requirement -- SPAN 3410.

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

  • Section 003 “READING SPANISH POETRY”  T/TH 2:00-2:50PM in New Cabell Hall 303 with Andrew Anderson

Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Spanish literature requirement -- SPAN 3410.

This upper-level course will provide a kind of workshop environment for learning and practicing a range of techniques in order to read, analysis, interpret, and appreciate Spanish poetry.  We will read selected examples of poems from a wide range of authors and a wide range of time periods; most of the poetry will be by Spanish authors, while some will be by Latin American authors.  A high level of active participation will be expected of all students.

SPAN 4510 – Special Topics Literature Seminars with Allison Bigelow and Trevor Dadson, Visiting Distinguish Professor

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

  • Section 001 T/TH 12:30-1:45PM in New Cabell Hall 315 with Allison Bigelow

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

  • Section 002 MoWE   12:30-1:45PM in Lower West Oval Room  102 with Trevor Dadson, Visiting Distinguish Professor

SPAN 4520 – Latin American Revolutions with Anne Garland Mahler

M/W 2:00-3:15pm, Wilson Hall 214

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

This course examines literature, film, artwork, and other cultural production from Latin America’s major revolutions of the twentieth century. It will focus on the violent social revolutions of Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua, as well as social movements in Guatemala, Chile, and Venezuela. We will use cultural production as a way to understand why these revolutions occurred, how they transformed economic, social, and cultural relations, how they were accompanied by revolutions in artistic form, and in what ways these revolutions both enthused and disappointed the people most affected by them. The course content will include diverse artistic media including poetry, mural paintings, photography, testimonies, music, and novels

SPAN 4530 – Special Topics Language Seminar with Emily Scida and David Korfhagen

Prerequisites: SPAN 3010; AND SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200 or another course in Linguistics

  • Section 001 TuTh 2:00-3:15pm  in New Cabell Hall 364 with Emily Scida

How do people learn a second language (L2)?  How are first language acquisition and second language acquisition different?  Why are some learners more successful than others in learning a second language?  How do we measure “success” in second language acquisition?  How do we define “competence”?  I invite you to join me in the exploration of these and other exciting questions.  Together we will discover the processes and mechanisms that drive language acquisition by studying how various disciplines have contributed to the major theories and ideas informing the field of Second Language Acquisition.

  • Section 002 “Meaning in (the Spanish) language”  M/W/F 1:00-1:50pm in New Cabell Hall 303 with David Korfhagen

Span 4530-002- What is the nature of meaning, and how is it conveyed through language? What does it mean to say that a word or expression ‘means’ something? How do words and expressions change meanings over time? How has our approach to answering these questions changed over time? These are the main questions that will guide this course; while focusing on enhancing and reflecting on critical thinking skills, we will address these issues within the context of the Spanish language. Lectures and discussions will be conducted in Spanish.

. SPAN 4600 – Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics with Maria Isabel Richart Marset

T/TH 2:00-3:15PM in New Cabell Hall 168

Span 4700 – Spanish Culture and Civilization with Fernando Valverde Rodriguez

MoWeFr 1:00-1:50PM in New Cabell Hall 027

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.

This course deals with Spain in the 20th and 21st centuries.  It will begin with the most important political events since 1900 (end of the Monarchy of Alfonso XIII, the 2nd Republic, Spanish Civil War, Franco Dictatorship), up to the present political events of modern Spain ruled by a parliament under a monarchy, and integrated into the European Community.  Special emphasis will be put in understanding Spain in its complexity, social composition and decomposition, fiestas, and the main social changes of the Spanish society after the death of Franco in 1975 (immigration, nationalism).  Part of the course will be dedicated to the study of the Spanish artistic movements and its most relevant contemporary representatives in the field of music (flamenco and popular), painting (Dalí, Picasso, Sorolla), architecture (Gaudí, Calatrava), dance.

Span 4710 – Latin American Culture and Civilization with Fernando Operé

MoWe 3:30-4:45PM in Wilson Hall 214

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

This course intends to acquaint the student with the history and culture of two important countries in Latin America: Argentina and Mexico. We will start with pre-Columbian cultures, and the historical evolution from colonial times, the Independent period up to the present. The second part of the course will be dedicated to study cultural and social topics: identity; race and ethnicity; city and countryside; artistic and music production; food and cuisine; fluctuations in the economy; religion and its many manifestations; and violence and resistance among others. The methodology is the consistent comparison of these two countries in the most important faces of their history and development.

 

Spanish Spring 2020

Spanish Graduate Courses – Taught in Spanish

SPAN 5820  – Spanish America: From Romanticism to Modernism with Fernando Operé

M/W 2:00-3:15PM in New Cabell Hall 407

SPAN 7850 – Themes and Genres with Trevor Dadson, Visiting Distinguish Professor and Samuel Amago

  • Section 001 – “Moriscos and other Minorities in Early Modern Spain” M 3:30-6:00PM in New Cabell Hall 209 with Trevor Dadson, Visiting Distinguish Professor

 

  • Section 002- “Film Theory” T/Th 12:30-1:45PM in Kerchof Hall 317 with Sam Amago

Course objectives:

Over the course of the semester, we will develop and refine the vocabularies and analytical skills essential for teaching and research in Hispanic film studies. Students will gain a working knowledge of some of the major currents in theory and international film movements since 1950, including realism, auteurism, counter and Third Cinema movements, psychoanalytical and feminist approaches, spectatorship and subjectivity, globalization, colonialism and indigeneity. Case studies will be drawn principally from the cinemas of the Spanish-speaking world.

The seminar has three objectives:

  1. To introduce theoretical, analytical and historical approaches to the study of fiction film and documentary to graduate students with no prior experience in film studies;
  2. To provide a snapshot of the state of the field of Film Studies within the framework of international developments in academia and emerging theoretical and methodological perspectives and interdisciplinary issues;
  3. To think about resources, techniques, and tools available for research and teaching in Film Studies.

Course requirements:

Students will lead one class discussion and write two papers: a 4-5 page close formal analysis of one short film sequence (chosen in consultation with the professor), and a final paper (10-15 pages).

Required Texts:

David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson. Film Art: An Introduction. McGraw Hill

Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen, eds. Film Theory and Criticism. Oxford UP.

 

SPAN 7860 – Regional Literature: Mass Media and Spanish American Narrativewith Gustavo Pellón

TuTh 3:30-6:00PM in New Caball Hall 407

In this course we will study the fascination various contemporary novelists have for kitsch, mass culture, and "bad literature."  We will examine how these authors reconcile kitsch and art, and we will consider the aesthetic and social consequences of their experiments.

Alejo Carpentier.  Los pasos perdidos.

Manuel Puig.  Boquitas pintadas.  Penguin

Mario Vargas Llosa.  La tía Julia y el escribidor

Gabriel García Márquez.   El amor en los tiempos del cólera.  Penguin

Severo Sarduy.  De donde son los cantantes

Luis Rafael Sánchez.  La guaracha del Macho Camacho. 

Isabel Allende.  Eva Luna.  Harper Collins

Osvaldo Soriano.  Triste, solitario y final

José Ortega y Gasset.  La rebelión de las masas.

Matei Calinescu.  Five Faces of Modernity: Modernism, Avant-garde, Decadence, Kitsch, Postmodernism (Duke UP, 1987).  

Milan Kundera. The Unbearable Lightness of Being.

SPAN 8560 – The Latin American Jungle Noval with Charlotte Rogers

We 3:30-6:00PM in New Cabell Hall 411