Course Listing

Italian Fall 2016

Taught in Italian

ITAL 1010 – Elementary Italian I  

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites:  No prior instruction in Italian.  Students with previous experience in Italian must take the Italian placement exam on Monday, August 22.  Students may not self-place in a language course.

Italian 1010 is a four-credit beginning level course designed to provide a thorough foundation in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Audio-visual material and readings focus on contemporary Italian lifestyle and provide insight into Italy’s vibrant society and rich cultural heritage. Class is conducted in Italian only.

ITAL 2010 – Intermediate Italian I  

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites: Passing grade in ITAL 1020 or department permission. Students may not self-place in a language course. Students who did not complete ITAL 1020 are required to take the Italian placement exam on Monday, August 22. All students will submit proof of placement by August 26.

Intermediate Italian is the third class in a four-course sequence, which fulfills the language requirement. However, it is also an occasion for students to further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills as well as deepen their cultural literacy in Italian. You will accomplish these goals, with the guidance of your instructor, through review of grammar, short readings, compositions, and listening and speaking activities. Students will also have the opportunity to listen to songs, comment on works of art, watch commercials and short films, read newspaper articles, and meet natives of Italy in your quest to become more confident and competent users of the Italian language. Much like learning to play a sport or a musical instrument, studying a foreign language requires constant practice. Therefore, class will be conducted in Italian only.

ITAL 3010 – Advanced Italian I  with Adrienne Ward 

MWF 11:00-11:50AM in CAB 032

Prerequisite: ITAL 2020

Includes idiomatic Italian conversation and composition, anthological readings of literary texts in Italian, plus a variety of oral exercises including presentations, skits, and debates. Italian composition is emphasized through writing assignments and selective review of the fine points of grammar and syntax. 

ITAL 3110 – Medieval and Renaissance Masterpieces  with Enrico Cesaretti 

TR 12:30-1:45PM in TBA

Prerequisites: ITAL 2020

Intro to Italian Medieval and Renaissance Literature -  This course is an introduction to classic literary works belonging to Italian medieval and renaissance literature. We shall examine around 300 years of Italian cultural and literary history, from Sicilian love poetry to Machiavelli's Prince, and discuss how these texts can still be relevant in our contemporary times.

Taught in English

ITTR 3770 – The Culture of Italian Comedy  with Adrienne Ward 

MWF 12:00-12:50PM in CAB 032

Learn the unique history and characteristics of Italian-style comedy!  Study main strains of Italian comic culture starting with medieval and early modern traditions (theater, poetry, opera, song), then modern expressions of Italian humor in film, short fiction, online periodicals and cartoons. Discover differences in comedic traditions among regions (eg Tuscan vs Neapolitan humor), and learn theories of comedy by Pirandello, Benigni, Eco.  Because a fundamental component of Italian comic culture derives from Tuscan traditions, study of these aspects will make the course especially interesting for students planning to go to or just returned from UVa study abroad programs in Siena and Florence. In ENGLISH.

ITTR 4820 – Italian Pop Culture from the 1960s to the Present with Enrico Cesaretti

TR 11:00am-12:15PM in Ruffner 125

This course is an historical examination of the cultural and socio-political transformations that took place in Italy during its recent history. By discussing different cultural products (film, literature, music, comic books) in the period under consideration and a selection of critical essays dealing with various aspects of Italian culture, we shall (also) reflect on the following questions: does Italy still have space for works that resist populist and consumer culture? What are the ethical and socio-political consequences of Italy’s present cultural condition? How did Italian literature and cinema dealt with the changes brought by modernity?

Portuguese Fall 2016

Taught in Portuguese

PORT 1110 – Beginning Intensive Portuguese with Lilian Feitosa

Prerequisite: Completion of FREN 2020 or SPAN 2020, or instructor permission.

  • Section 001 MWF 11:00-11:50AM in CAB 191
  • Section 002 MWF 12:00-12:50PM in CAB 191

Introduces speaking, understanding, reading and writing Portuguese, especially as used in Brazil. Five class hours and one laboratory hour. Followed by PORT 2120. 

PORT 3010 – Advanced Grammar, Conversation and Composition with Lilian Feitosa  

MWF 10:00-10:50AM in CAB 191

Prerequisite: PORT 2120 or by permission.

Studies advanced grammar through analysis of texts; includes extensive practice in composition and topical conversation. 

PORT 3559 – New Course in Portuguese "New Brazilian Television Fiction" with Eli Carter 

TuTh 3:30-4:45PM in New CAB 036   (Note: This course is cross-listed with Media Studies course MDST 3559  "New Brazilian Television Fiction")

The objective of this course is to examine the development of Brazilian television fiction from its origins in 1950 to modern-day broadcast, paid TV, and Internet programming. To this end, the course will focus on key policies and players—networks, screenwriters, directors, and independent production companies—formats, different modes of production, and financing mechanisms.

PORT 4410 – Brazilian Cultural Production I (1500 to 1900)  with Eli Carter 

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM  in New CAB 036

Prerequisite: The completion of PORT 3010 or equivalent

Portuguese nobleman Pedro Álvares Cabral and his fleet of 13 ships representing the then thriving Iberian Empire left Lisbon in March of 1500 for the East Indies.  History informs us that after passing the Cape Verde Islands, the fleet, likely unintentionally, headed west, away from the African coast.  Roughly a month later, on April 21, 1500, Cabral and his men came upon a northeastern piece of coastline that would eventually form part of the country known formally today as Brazil.  From the earliest moments of Portugal’s arrival to and subsequent, albeit somewhat uneven, colonization of the vast territory, references to Brazil’s edenic nature have permeated the country’s literary production.

The purpose of this course is to examine Brazilian Literature from 1900 to the present, providing the student with a broad understanding and historical contextualization of the most important literary works, figures, themes, genres, and periods. The first half of the course will largely focus on Modernismo, while the second half on more contemporary trends. Although we will emphasize our readings of the works themselves, we will use José Murilo de Carvalho’s exploration of the historical presence of the edenic and satanic motifs in the Brazilian social imaginary as a theoretical point of departure.

CANCELLED:  PORT 4420 – Brazilian Cultural Production II (1900 to Present)  with Eli Carter 

Prerequisite: The completion of PORT 3010 or equivalent

This course will not be offered during Fall 2016.

Portuguese nobleman Pedro Álvares Cabral and his fleet of 13 ships representing the then thriving Iberian Empire left Lisbon in March of 1500 for the East Indies.  History informs us that after passing the Cape Verde Islands, the fleet, likely unintentionally, headed west, away from the African coast.  Roughly a month later, on April 21, 1500, Cabral and his men came upon a northeastern piece of coastline that would eventually form part of the country known formally today as Brazil.  From the earliest moments of Portugal’s arrival to and subsequent, albeit somewhat uneven, colonization of the vast territory, references to Brazil’s edenic nature have permeated the country’s literary production.

Moving back and forth between Modernismo and more contemporary trends, the purpose of this course is to examine Brazilian Literature from 1900 to the present, providing the student with a broad understanding and historical contextualization of the most important literary works, figures, themes, genres, and periods.

Spanish Fall 2016

Taught in Spanish

SPAN 1010 – Elementary Spanish  Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites: No previous formal instruction in Spanish, or an SAT II score less than 410. SPAN 1010 is for true beginners only.  Students with prior experience with Spanish must take the UVA Spanish placement exam. Students may not self-place in a language course.  All students will submit proof of placement by August 26.

Elementary Spanish is a four-credit introductory level hybrid course for true beginners designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities on Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 1060 – Accelerated Elementary Spanish  Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites: Placement score of 420-510 on the SAT II Exam or a score of 0-325 on the UVA Placement Exam. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by August 26.

Accelerated Elementary Spanish a four-credit accelerated introductory level hybrid course designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities with Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2010 – Intermediate Spanish Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites: SPAN 1020, SPAN 1060, or SAT II score of 520-590, or Placement Test score of 326-409. Students may not self-place in a language course.  All students will submit proof of placement by August 26.

Intermediate Spanish is a three-credit intermediate level course, the third course in a four-course sequence, which fulfills the language requirement.  The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2020 – Advanced Intermediate Spanish  Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites: Spanish 2010, SAT II Test score of 600-640, or UVA Placement Test score of 410-535. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by August 26.

Advanced Intermediate Spanish is a three credit intermediate level course, the fourth course in a four-course sequence which fulfills the language requirement. The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 3000 – Phonetics  with Omar Velázquez-Mendoza 

TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM  in New CAB 287

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent.

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student's pronunciation.

SPAN 3010 – Grammar and Composition I 

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisite: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent); or UVA placement test score of 536-650; or AP score of 4; or SAT II score of 641-700; or IB Spanish (High) score of 7.

This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the critical review, the persuasive essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3020 – Grammar and Composition II 

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisites: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent) AND either of the following: a UVA placement test score of 651+; an AP score of 5; an SAT II score of 701-800; an IB Spanish A1 or A2 score of 5, 6 or 7.

This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the comparative essay, the argumentative essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3030 – Cultural Conversations --- ALL SECTIONS CANCELLED for FALL 2016

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

How can we identify different aspects of Spanish, Spanish American and Latino cultures? Held as a seminar-style, this course will establish a dialogue with visual, written, and oral narratives that deal with various cultural aspects of Hispanic cultures, such as the importance of family and travel, the creation of identity, romance, and humor. This course covers student-led discussions of material ranging from short stories, to flash-fictions, films, poetry, video-clip, newspapers, as well as cultural theoretical readings. Student progress will be assessed through pop-quizzes, response papers, discussion groups, oral presentations, and written exams. Throughout the course, the grammatical component of the language is gradually reviewed and tested.

SPAN 3040 – Business Spanish 

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

This course deals with topics related to the business world. Some of the aspects we will study in detail include the writing of business letters (buying and selling products, recommendations, Curriculum Vitae, etc.), labor relations, systems of organizing businesses, the banking system and financial sector, publicity and marketing, types of companies, and the economic and commercial realities of Spain and Latin America. The study of politics will also be a central part of the course given that this determines the economic path of a country, including its currency, commercial relations, and investments. SPAN 3040 (Business Spanish) prepares students to converse about business topics in Spanish. Each student will develop a basic vocabulary for the business world and create commercial business documents that will be useful in the Hispanic world. Even though we will discuss topics related to the business world in Spanish-speaking countries, this is NOT a traditional "Business Class" like you might find in the McIntire School of Commerce. Since it is a conversation class, participation is key and students will need to be actively reading and actively engaged in every class.

SPAN 3050 – Spanish for Medical Professionals 

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

Are you able to interact on a daily basis with Spanish-speaking doctors, nurses, or patients? This course is designed for students planning to work in the health care field and who want to develop fundamental written and oral skills and vocabulary for the assessment of Spanish speaking patients in a variety of settings. Students will gain familiarity with non-technical and semi-technical functional vocabulary, along with idiomatic expressions and situational phrases that are used in a Spanish-speaking medical context. The student will show her/his improvement through quizzes, exams, oral practices, and class discussions. This course will use technology and media, and will help students to develop written and oral abilities related to the health care field.

SPAN 3300 – Texts and Interpretation 

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement. (Note: SPAN 3300 or instructor permission is prerequisite for any course in Spanish literature or culture with a number above SPAN 3300.)

In this course we will be covering a variety of basic approaches to literary texts that enable us to analyze and understand them better.  The course will be organized on the basis of literary genre (narrative, theater, poetry, etc.), with a portion of the semester dedicated to each.  Short texts in Spanish for readings will be drawn from both Spanish and Latin American literature, and from a range of time periods.

SPAN 3400 – Survey of Spanish Literature I (Middle Ages to 1700)  with E. Michael Gerli 

MWF 11:00-11:50AM in New CAB 132

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

El curso coniste en un panorama introductorio a la literatura castellana de la Edad Media, el renacimiento, y el barroco, o sea la temprana modernidad hasta 1680 (la fecha de la muerte de Calderón de la Barca). Las obras se estudiarán en su contexto histórico-cultural. Además de intentar estimular un aprecio por algunas obras maestras de estos períodos, se intentará dar a conocer el marco histórico-intelectual de varias facetas de la cultura peninsular, tanto como enseñar algunas estrategias para la lectura atenta de los textos antiguos.

SPAN 3410 – Survey of Spanish Literature II (1700 to Present)  with David Gies 

TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in New CAB 168

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement.

This course, taught entirely in Spanish, covers major works of Spanish literature from the early Enlightenment to the present day (from Feijoo to Muñoz Molina).  Required daily readings, daily quizzes, two written exams (midterm, final), final paper.

SPAN 3420 – Survey of Latin American Literature I (Colonial to 1900) with Allison Bigelow 

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in Minor 130

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement.

¿Qué es la literatura colonial en América, la así llamada cuarta parte del mundo? ¿Quiénes son sus autores principales, cuáles son sus temas y topos centrales? Más allá de estas preguntas concretas, la diversidad de las formas literarias, los idiomas y las expresiones de la complejidad humana en la época colonial nos lleva a cuestiones más amplias. Por ejemplo, ¿cómo definimos la literatura en un momento histórico en el cual la mayoría de la gente escribió sin letras? ¿Qué quiere decir “la época colonial” en América Latina, ya que cuenta con diversas cronologías históricas? ¿Cómo entendemos la literatura colonial en su contexto histórico, con sus propias tradiciones estéticas, y también a través de la herencia formativa que aún vivimos hoy en día?

En este curso introductorio, analizaremos la tremenda diversidad de literatura colonial a través de conversaciones en la sala de clase y trabajos escritos. Una serie de talleres de composición, realizados mayormente en la primera mitad del semestre, nos ayudara a desarrollar ideas y mejorar la expresión de ellas a base de la escritura. Después del examen parcial nos enfocaremos en la comunicación oral, conversando temas principales en grupos pequeños para así practicar antes del examen final, que se realiza de forma hablada. Las metas del curso abordan efectivamente la apreciación de la gama rica de los textos coloniales, la explicación de textos literarios con ideas creativas y vocabulario critico, y la colaboración con sus compañeras y compañeros en los trabajos orales y escritos.

Lectura: del libro _Voces de Hispanoamérica_ (ed. Raquel Chang-Rodríguez y Malva E. Filer) y en Collab

SPAN 3430 – Survey of Latin American Literature II (1900 to Present):

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

  • Section 001  with Charlotte Rogers  TuTh 12:30-1:45PM  in New CAB

This course is a survey of Modern Spanish American literature to introduce students to major authors, works, and literary movements of Spanish America from 1900 to the present. Students will read poetry and short prose selections as well as a novel. Class participation and attendance, papers, exams and other assignments.

  • Section 002  with María-Inés Lagos  MWF 12:00-12:50PM  in New CAB 383

This course is a survey of Modern Spanish American literature to introduce students to major authors, works, and literary movements of Spanish America from 1880 to the present. Students will read poetry and short prose selections from an anthology (Huellas de las Literaturas Hispanoamericanas) as well as a short novel. Class participation and attendance, two papers, two exams and other assignments.

SPAN 4040 – Translation from Spanish to English Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 4500 – Special Topics Literature Seminar

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

  • Section 001 “Representing Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz”  with Allison Bigelow  TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM  New CAB 132

In this seminar for advanced undergraduates, we will spend half of the course swimming in the intellectual and spiritual complexities of the poetry and prose of Mexican nun Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1651-1695), including villancicos, redondillas, sonetos, loas, and epistolary exchanges (Carta atenagórica, La respuesta a Sor Filotea de la Cruz). In the second half of the term, we will examine how various artists, authors, and editors have represented Sor Juana in images and words from the eighteenth century through the present. We will pay particular attention to the mode of representation (painting, film, currency, essay, Internet meme), as well as the historical context in which diverse women and men have represented Sor Juana’s ideas, beliefs, and body, including Juan de Miranda (Spain, s. XVIII), Miguel Cabrera (México, s. XVIII), Andrés de Islas (México, s. XVIII), Octavio Paz (México, s. XX), María Luisa Bemberg (Argentina, s. XX), Estela Portillo Trambley (Tejas/Texas, s. XX-XXI), Alicia Gaspar de Alba (Tejas/Texas, s. XX-XXI), Jesusa Rodríguez (DF/NYC, 2007), el Banco de México (2008), and tech-savvy millennials. Students will write a midterm exam (including a proposal for their final project) and serve as weekly discussion leaders in preparation for their final projects, which can be critical (8-10 page seminar paper) or creative (digital short, painting, poetry, short story, etc.), individually or in groups.

  • Section 002 “Latin American Detective Fiction”  with Charlotte Rogers  TuTh 2:00-3:15PM  New CAB 132

This course examines detective fiction from its origins in the Anglophone tradition to its contemporary manifestations in Spanish American literature.  We will study the genre’s form and the way in which authors mobilize that form to make a variety of political, social and aesthetic comments.  The figure of the detective and his relationship to society, the role of the police in (not) solving the crime, and the themes of corruption, sexuality, class conflict, and varying conceptions of justice will form the basis of our conversations. Papers and class participation are expected; the students will also have the option of writing their own detective story.

  • Section 003 "Afro-Latinidad Across the Americas"  (This course will be taught by a new faculty member. Professor Alison Weber will temporarily be listed as the instructor in SIS; however, she will NOT teach this class.)  MWF 10:00-10:50AM  New CAB 032

This course is a survey of the history and literature of the African diaspora in Latin America from the Caribbean, Mexico, and the Rio de la Plata to the “Latin American” cities of New York and Miami. From the earliest days of Spanish colonization to fighting in the wars of independence to forging global political and cultural networks from the cold war to present-day, African-descended peoples have had an undeniably central role in defining Latin America’s history and its present. Yet Afro-Latin American experiences and literatures are often made invisible in mainstream media and in scholarship.  In this course, we will engage a wide array of texts and films on the experiences of peoples of African descent in Latin America, ranging from narratives about black conquistadors to testimonies of runaway slaves to Afro-Latin@ contributions to the origins of hip-hop in the United States. There will be a midterm exam, papers, and a presentation.

SPAN 4600 – Literature and Cinema with Randolph Pope 

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in New CAB 168

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

We will consider movies that are based on Spanish or Latin American short stories or novels, comparing the different genres. Two brief papers, mid-term, and final exam.

Span 4700 – Spanish Culture and Civilization with Fernando Operé 

TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in Minor 130

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

This course deals with Spain in the 20th and 21st centuries.  It will begin with the most important political events since 1900 (end of the Monarchy of Alfonso XIII, the 2nd Republic, Spanish Civil War, Franco Dictatorship), up to the present political events of modern Spain ruled by a parliament under a monarchy, and integrated into the European Community and the economical crisis.  Special emphasis will be put in understanding Spain in its complexity, social composition, fiestas, and the main social changes of the Spanish society after the death of Franco in 1975 (immigration, nationalism).  Part of the course will be dedicated to the study of the Spanish artistic movements and its most relevant contemporary representatives in the field of music (flamenco and popular), painting (Dalí, Picasso, Sorolla), architecture (Gaudí, Calatrava), dance.

SPAN 4704 – Islamic Iberia  with E. Michael Gerli 

MWF 2:00-2:50PM  in New CAB 032

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

The course offers an introduction to Islam and a cultural history of al Andalus (Islamic Iberia) from 711 until the expulsion of the Morsicos from early modern Spain (1609-1614. It will concentrate on several major moments: The Emirate/Caliphate of Córdoba and Islamic hegemony in the peninsula; the fragmentation of the Caliphate and the cultural splendor of the taifa kingdoms in the eleventh century; the advent of Moslem fundamentalism from the Maghreb in the eleventh and twelfth centuries; the phenomenon of mudejarismo (Islamic subjects that live under Christian rule) after the Christian conquest of Seville and Córdoba in the thirteenth century; the contradictions posed by Islam in Granada, a client state of Castile during most of its history, after the decline of Islam in the rest of the peninsula (1250-1492); and the problems created by the presence of Muslim culture in a Christian state during the sixteenth-century.

Span 4710 – Latin American Culture and Civilization (This class will NOT be offered in during the Fall 2016 semester.)

SPAN 4715 – Cuban Culture Through Cinema with Gustavo Pellón

TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM  New CAB 168

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

The aim of this course is to study Cuban films in the context of Cuba's history and culture.  The course will include the viewing of films outside the classroom (roughly one per week), readings about the films, history, and culture.   Please note that out-of-class preparation and the reading load will be significant (6-9 hours per week).  All films will be available for you to view in our course Collab site.  The format of the class will be lecture/discussion with a strong emphasis on class participation. 

Grading:  Your grade will be determined by

  • A midterm exam about the history and culture of Cuba.
  • 250-word reaction papers on every film.
  • A longer research paper (15 pages) on a topic of your choice to be approved by me.

Each is worth a third of your grade.  

The research paper will be written in Spanish and will be evaluated on the quality of the writing (grammar and spelling 50%) as well as the ideas (clarity of expression, accuracy 50%).  I take off one point for each grammatical mistake, including accents.  Pay close attention to proofreading.  It is recommended you proofread a hard copy as it is easier to miss mistakes and typos on a screen.

Texts: 

  • Michael Chanan.  Cuban Cinema.  University of Minnesota Press, 2004.
  • Louis A. Pérez, Jr.  Cuba Between Reform and Revolution.  Oxford UP, 1995.
  • Texts in Collab.
  • Streetwise Cuba [a pocket laminated map]. 

Films: (All films will be available for you to view in our course Collab site.)

  • Fidel Castro (2005) PBS documentary, Adriana Bosch, dir.
  • Memorias del subdesarrollo (1968) Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, dir.
  • Lucía (1968) Humberto Solás, dir.
  • La última cena (1977) Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, dir.
  • Retrato de Teresa (1979) Pastor Vega, dir.
  • Fresa y chocolate (1994) Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, Juan Carlos Tabío, dir.
  • The Perez Family (1995) Mira Nair, dir.
  • Azúcar amarga (1996) León Ichaso, dir.
  • Suite Habana (2003) Fernando Pérez, dir.

 

Spanish Fall 2016

SPAN 5650 – Realism and Generation of 1898 with Randolph Pope 

W 6:30-9:00PM in New CAB 068

In the first part of the course we will study what is realism, reading works by Alarcón, Fernán Caballero, Valera, Galdós, and Clarín. In the second part, we will study works by Baroja, Valler-Inclán, Azorín, and Unamuno. Two brief essays and final exam.

SPAN 5820 – Spanish America: From Romanticism to Modernism  with Fernando Operé 

Tu 3:30-6:00PM in Shannon House 109

This is a core course that studies the main literary currents in Latin America from the days of the Independence in the 19th century up to the beginning of the 20th century with the arrival of modernism, and the professionalization of writing. The first writers of the Independence were intellectuals concerned not only with the task of building nations but also with the construction of cultural identities. These preoccupations absorbed their interests and inspired their writings. This course will deal with the ideological origins of these productions and how these works can fit into the major literary tendencies in other parts of the world. In other words, we will discuss the dependence and independence of Latin American literature during the period. The authors to be studied are: Esteban Echeverría "La cautiva" y El matadero, Domingo Sarmiento Facundo, civilización y barbarie, José Hernández Martín Fierro, Ricardo Palma Tradiciones peruanas, Mariano Azuela Los de abajo,Jorge Isaac María ; and the poetry de José Martí and Rubén Darío, as well as theory on Romanticism, and Modernism

SPAN 7220 – History of the Language  with Joel Rini 

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in New CAB 056

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 7710 – Literature and the Civil War  with Andrew Anderson 

M 3:30-6:00PM  in New CAB 594

In this seminar, we will be looking at a number of artistic treatments of a variety of different aspects of the Spanish Civil War, in novels, plays, and films.  While we will certainly address the historical events depicted, we will primarily be concerned with different story-telling strategies and perspectives adopted by the writers and film-makers.  We will be examining some texts of which a film adaptation was later made, analyzing and comparing both versions, but we will also examine a few films independently (whether or not they are adaptions of literary texts), and likewise we will read a few texts independently (whether or not they have corresponding film versions).  The films and literary works under scrutiny date from the 1980s to the late 2000s.

SPAN 7850 – Themes and Genres  with David Gies 

TuTh 3:30-6:00PM  in New CAB 115

This course will look at nineteenth-century Spanish theatre, with an emphasis on the Romantic movement and the plays and types of plays (the comedia de magia, for example) which led up to the creation of Don Juan Tenorio (1844).  We will then study works which were subsequently influenced by Zorrilla’s masterpiece or which recall elements of that play.  The plays to be studied include:  La pata de cabra (Grimaldi, 1829), El diablo verde (anonymous, 1830), Don Alvaro o la fuerza del sino (Rivas, 1835), Carlos II el Hechizado (Gil, 1837), El desengaño en un sueño (Rivas, 1842), Don Juan Tenorio (Zorrilla, 1844), Españoles sobre todo (Asquerino, 1844), El hombre de mundo (Vega, 1845), Cosas de don Juan (Bretón, 1854), El nuevo don Juan (López de Ayala, 1863), Un Tenorio moderno (Nogués, 1864), El anillo del diablo  (Zumel, 1871), and Doña Juana Tenorio (Liern, 1876).

SPAN 8210 – Teaching Foreign Languages  with Emily Scida 

TuTh 11:00-12:15PM in CAB 115

This course provides graduate students teaching foreign languages at UVA with the opportunity to observe and apply new ideas and teaching principles through practical activities and to develop their own personal theories of teaching through systematic reflection and experimentation.

SPAN 8560 – Seminars: Spanish America:  Modern Period "Latin American Women Writers"  with María-Inés Lagos

W 3:30-6:00PM in New CAB 283

In this seminar we will study how women writers have represented subjectivity in texts from the early decades of the 20th century to the present. We will focus on a selective group of authors from different periods: 1) Victoria Ocampo (speeches, autobiography), Gabriela Mistral and Alfonsina Storni; 2) Rosario Castellanos (poems, a short story, and her novel Balún-Canán); 3) Narratives by Rosario Ferré, Luisa Valenzuela and Diamela Eltit; 4) authors of the younger generations (Andrea Jeftanovic, Alejandra Costamagna). In addition to the primary texts we will read essays on gender theory and discuss films by women directors or that focus on pertinent themes. Class participation, oral presentations, research paper.

K’iche’ Fall 2016

KICH 1020 – Introduction to Maya K’iche’ II  

TuTh 4:00-5:15PM  in New CAB 044  with Allison Bigelow

The second part of a year-long sequence that introduces students to Maya K’iche’, this course focuses on three main areas: K’iche’ language, Maya linguistics, and Maya culture. The language and linguistics elements of the course will allow students to learn and understand complex relationships – the relationship of sound to syntax, of language to literature – in an entirely new cultural context and content area, building from their knowledge of K’iche’ I to expand and enrich their studies. Students will thus learn how to apply their work in other classes, especially linguistics, anthropology, Spanish, and Latin American studies, to a new body of content, recognizing how their study of other languages, literary forms, and issues in global development can enhance their study of K’iche’, and how to communicate those insights through the target language.

KICH 2020 – Intermediate Maya K’iche’ II  

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM  in New CAB 211  with Allison Bigelow

As the Maya K'iche' capstone course in the Duke-UVa-Vanderbilt consortium for the teaching of less commonly taught languages, this class asks students to apply their introductory study of grammar to original research with primary and secondary sources, print and oral alike. Having studied the difference between colonial-era and contemporary orthographies in KICH 2010, students will now work with primary sources and different translations of K’iche’ texts; for example, they might compare Dennis Tedlock’s translation of the Popol Vuh with and Allen Christenson’s more recent work, or they might choose to write their final essay on the work of contemporary poet Sam Colop. By collaborating with the Vanderbilt-based instructor of K’iche’, students will identify a research topic that reflects their larger academic and professional interests, learning how to integrate their work in other classes, especially linguistics, anthropology, comparative literature, Spanish, and Latin American studies, to their study of K’iche’. This capstone course will also ask that they recognize how their study of other languages, literary forms, and issues in global development can enhance their study of K’iche’, and how to communicate those insights through the target language.

K’iche’ Spring 2017

KICH 1020 – Introduction to Maya K’iche’ II  

TuTh 4:00-5:15PM  in New CAB 044  with Allison Bigelow

The second part of a year-long sequence that introduces students to Maya K’iche’, this course focuses on three main areas: K’iche’ language, Maya linguistics, and Maya culture. The language and linguistics elements of the course will allow students to learn and understand complex relationships – the relationship of sound to syntax, of language to literature – in an entirely new cultural context and content area, building from their knowledge of K’iche’ I to expand and enrich their studies. Students will thus learn how to apply their work in other classes, especially linguistics, anthropology, Spanish, and Latin American studies, to a new body of content, recognizing how their study of other languages, literary forms, and issues in global development can enhance their study of K’iche’, and how to communicate those insights through the target language.

KICH 2020 – Intermediate Maya K’iche’ II  

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM  in New CAB 211  with Allison Bigelow

As the Maya K'iche' capstone course in the Duke-UVa-Vanderbilt consortium for the teaching of less commonly taught languages, this class asks students to apply their introductory study of grammar to original research with primary and secondary sources, print and oral alike. Having studied the difference between colonial-era and contemporary orthographies in KICH 2010, students will now work with primary sources and different translations of K’iche’ texts; for example, they might compare Dennis Tedlock’s translation of the Popol Vuh with and Allen Christenson’s more recent work, or they might choose to write their final essay on the work of contemporary poet Sam Colop. By collaborating with the Vanderbilt-based instructor of K’iche’, students will identify a research topic that reflects their larger academic and professional interests, learning how to integrate their work in other classes, especially linguistics, anthropology, comparative literature, Spanish, and Latin American studies, to their study of K’iche’. This capstone course will also ask that they recognize how their study of other languages, literary forms, and issues in global development can enhance their study of K’iche’, and how to communicate those insights through the target language.

Spanish Spring 2017

Spanish (SPAN) Courses – Taught in Spanish

SPAN 1020 – Elementary Spanish  

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites:  Passing grade in SPAN 1010. SPAN 1020 is for true beginners only. Students with prior experience with Spanish in high school must take the UVA Spanish placement exam. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by January 23.

Elementary Spanish (SPAN 1020) is a four-credit introductory level hybrid course for true beginners designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities on Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 1060 – Accelerated Elementary Spanish  

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: Placement score of 420-510 on the SAT II Exam or a score of 0-325 on the UVA Placement Exam. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by January 23.

Accelerated Elementary Spanish a four-credit accelerated introductory level hybrid course designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities with Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2010 – Intermediate Spanish  

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: SPAN 1020, SPAN 1060, or SAT II score of 520-590, or Placement Test score of 326-409. Students may not self-place in a language course.  All students will submit proof of placement by January 23.

Intermediate Spanish is a three-credit intermediate level course, the third course in a four-course sequence, which fulfills the language requirement.  The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2020 – Advanced Intermediate Spanish  

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: Spanish 2010, SAT II Test score of 600-640, or UVA Placement Test score of 410-535. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by January 23.

Advanced Intermediate Spanish is a three credit intermediate level course, the fourth course in a four-course sequence which fulfills the language requirement. The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 3000 – Phonetics  

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent.

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student's pronunciation.

  • Section 001  MWF 1:00-1:50PM in New CAB 027  with Omar Velázquez-Mendoza
  • Section 002  MoWe 2:00-3:15PM in New CAB 395  with Joel Rini
  • Section 003  TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in New CAB 291 with Emily Scida (S E C T I O N   C A N C E L L E D)

SPAN 3010 – Grammar and Composition I  

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent); or UVA placement test score of 536-650; or AP score of 4; or SAT II score of 641-700; or IB Spanish (High) score of 7.

This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the critical review, the persuasive essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3020 – Grammar and Composition II  

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent) AND either of the following: a UVA placement test score of 651+; an AP score of 5; an SAT II score of 701-800; an IB Spanish A1 or A2 score of 5, 6 or 7.

This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the comparative essay, the argumentative essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3030 – Cultural Conversations 

MWF 1:00-1:50  in GIB 341  with Carrie Bramlet

Prerequisite: SPAN3010 or the equivalent level of Spanish, in which case students will need to speak with the instructor ahead of time for permission to take the course.

How does a heterogeneous society live and thrive on a daily basis and how does it mediate diversity? What are the challenges that face a society enriched by ethnic and socioeconomic diversity? How do varying shades of culture blend to create a “society”? How do political and geographical histories affect modern-day political trends, public policy decisions, health care experiences, educational systems, and GDP? The study of Bolivia offers a wealth of material to the interested spectator who desires to increase his/her knowledge of Latin American countries and is particularly fascinating to Americans, whose country has traditionally not held the best of political ties with the nation.

This course has been designed to offer students an interdisciplinary taste of the historical, political, geographical and sociocultural aspects of the country of Bolivia while working toward further acquisition of the Spanish language and intercultural identity. Students will be paired with conversation partners in a classroom in La Paz, Bolivia who are learning English and will be asked to reflect on what they are learning about Bolivia and the language-learning process itself in weekly ePortfolio postings.

This course is primarily meant to provide students with maximum exposure to practice their spoken Spanish in a setting that comes as close to being an immersion experience as possible without leaving campus. Writing is also a key component to the course, including exploratory, journalistic and argumentative writing. Grades will be based upon in-class participation, ePortfolio development, and a final reflective paper in which students assess their learning throughout the course of the semester. This course will be conducted solely in Spanish and is ideal for Spanish majors and minors, those in the Latin American Studies Program as well as students in other fields (such as global studies, anthropology, politics, etc.) who have above an Advanced Intermediate level of Spanish. 

SPAN 3040 – Business Spanish  

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

This course deals with topics related to the business world. Some of the aspects we will study in detail include the writing of business letters (buying and selling products, recommendations, Curriculum Vitae, etc.), labor relations, systems of organizing businesses, the banking system and financial sector, publicity and marketing, types of companies, and the economic and commercial realities of Spain and Latin America. The study of politics will also be a central part of the course given that this determines the economic path of a country, including its currency, commercial relations, and investments. SPAN 3040 (Business Spanish) prepares students to converse about business topics in Spanish. Each student will develop a basic vocabulary for the business world and create commercial business documents that will be useful in the Hispanic world. Even though we will discuss topics related to the business world in Spanish-speaking countries, this is NOT a traditional "Business Class" like you might find in the McIntire School of Commerce. Since it is a conversation class, participation is key and students will need to be actively reading and actively engaged in every class.

SPAN 3050 – Spanish for Medical Professionals

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

This course is designed for students planning to work in the health care field and who want to develop fundamental written and oral skills and vocabulary for the assessment of Spanish speaking patients in a variety of settings. Students will gain familiarity with non-technical and semi-technical functional vocabulary, along with idiomatic expressions and situational phrases that are used in medical Spanish.

  • Section 001  MWF 12:00-12:50PM  in New CAB 415  with Alicia Lopez Operé
  • Section 002  MWF 1:00-1:50PM  in New CAB 415  with Alicia Lopez Operé

SPAN 3200 – Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics 

MWF 2:00-2:50PM  in New CAB 027 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 (or equivalent) or departmental placement

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 3300 – Texts and Interpretation  

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement. (Note: SPAN 3300 or instructor permission is prerequisite for any course in Spanish literature or culture with a number above SPAN 3300.)

In this course we will be covering a variety of basic approaches to literary texts that enable us to analyze and understand them better. The course will be organized on the basis of literary genre (narrative, theater, poetry, etc.), with a portion of the semester dedicated to each. Short texts in Spanish for readings will be drawn from both Spanish and Latin American literature, and from a range of time periods.

SPAN 3400 – Survey of Spanish Literature I (Middle Ages to 1700) 

TuTh 12:30-1:45PM  in New CAB 383  with E. Michael Gerli

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

El curso comprende una  introducción a la literatura castellana de la Edad Media, el renacimiento, y el barroco hasta 1680. Las obras se estudiarán en su contexto histórico-cultural. Además de intentar de estimular un aprecio por algunas obras maestras de estos períodos, el curso intentará dar a conocer el marco histórico-intelectual de varios aspectos de la cultura peninsular.

SPAN 3420 – Survey of Latin American Literature I (Colonial to 1900) 

MoWe 3:30-4:45PM  in Minor Hall 130 with Fernando Operé

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement.

This is a survey course of Latin American Literature to introduce students to the major authors, and literary movements of Latin American literature from the discovery in 1492 up to 1900.  Students will read and discuss selections of works from accounts of the conquest, colonial period and 19th century, studying its historical and literary importance. Some authors include: Columbus, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, José María de Heredia, Esteban Echeverría, Ricardo Palma, José Martí y Rubén Dario among others.

SPAN 3430 – Survey of Latin American Literature II (1900 to Present)

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement.

  • Section 001  TuTh 2:00-3:15PM i n New CAB 338  with Anne Mahler

This course provides students with a survey of Latin American literature and the context in which it has developed from 1900 to the present. Students will leave this course with a general understanding of the region’s major literary trends, including their social and political dimensions. “Literature,” in this course, refers to a wide range of cultural production from literary texts (novels, stories, essays, poems) to visual art, film, and song lyrics. Throughout the course, we will consider the following questions: How has Latin America’s cultural production shaped and been shaped by its cultures, peoples, and historical events? How do the consciousness, memory, and imagination expressed within the region’s literature both reflect and create the region’s realities? And perhaps most importantly, who has (and has not) had access to Latin America’s literature and how has that shaped the way the region has represented itself through both the written word and image?

  • Section 002  MWF 1:00-1:50PM  in New CAB 107  with María-Inés Lagos

This course is a survey of Modern Spanish American literature to introduce students to major authors, works, and literary movements of Spanish America from 1880 to the present taking into account the socio historical context to understand the issues presented in the literary works. Students will read poetry, short essays, and short prose selections from an anthology (Huellas de las Literaturas Hispanoamericanas) as well as a novella. We will also watch films and documentaries that will provide additional information on the social background and the changing times. Class participation and attendance, two papers, two exams and other assignments.

SPAN 4040 – Translation from Spanish to English  

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 4319 – Borges 

MWF 11:00-11:50AM  in New CAB 303  with Gustavo Pellón  

Requisitos: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 créditos de 3400-3430, o permiso del profesor.

Este curso se propone estudiar la obra de Jorge Luis Borges con énfasis en sus cuentos, sin excluir algunos ensayos y poemas.   El curso examinará la obra de Borges desde la perspectiva de la literatura comparada y a Borges como lector y escritor de literatura mundial. 

Tu nota se basará en 3 ensayos y las reflexiones sobre la lectura para cada clase.  Cada uno vale 25% de tu nota total.

Lecturas:

Ficciones (1944)

El Aleph (1949)

El informe de Brodie (1970)

Poesía completa.

Textos en Collab

SPAN 4320 – Contemporary Latin-American Short Fiction 

MoWe 3:30-4:45AM  in New CAB 303  with María-Inés Lagos  

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.

We will explore the great variety of the short story in Spanish America during the 20th and 21st century. Starting with Baldomero Lillo’s stories about life in the coal mines in Southern Chile at the turn of the 20th century, we will read short stories addressing a multiplicity of themes (family relationships, the workings of power and politics, love relationships, friendships, the intersection of social, political, gender, class and race issues, etc.) taking into account the socio historical context. Among the authors we will include Horacio Quiroga, María Luisa Bombal, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Julio Cortázar, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes, José Donoso, Elena Poniatowska, Luisa Valenzuela, Rosario Ferré, Liliana Heker, Ana María Shua, Roberto Bolaño, Cristina Peri Rossi, and a group of young writers born around 1970. We will also watch films and documentaries that will help us better understand the socio historical background. Class participation, 2 exams, quizzes and written assignments, and one research paper.

SPAN 4500 – Special Topics Literature Seminar

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

  • Section 001 – “Adventures in the Latin American Jungle”  MWF 12:00-12:50PM  in New CAB 303  with Charlotte Rogers

This course studies representations of the jungle in twentieth-century Latin American literature. In particular, we will study stories of travelers who journey into the wilderness and “go native” in the South American forest.  The course will address the following questions: How does the environment inform literary works? How does jungle travel change an individual’s conception of him- or herself in the world?  Is it possible to “go native,” and what does that process imply?  How has the environment shaped literature about South America, and vice versa? We will explore how the discourses of imperialism, anthropology, medicine and science shape the answers to this question.  Other elements common to these jungle novels, such as the encounter with the Other, the protagonists’ negotiation of sexuality and madness, and the enduring popularity of the jungle adventure myth will also be addressed. Texts by Quiroga, Rivera, Carpentier, Vargas Llosa, Mutis and Hatoum.

  • Section 002 – “Cervante’s novelas”  TuTh 3:30-4:15PM in New CAB 207  with E. Michael Gerli

El curso se centrará en las Novelas ejemplares de Cervantes (1613). Cada una de las doce obras se examinará desde una doble vertiente, por una parte teórica y por otra histórica, para explorar a fondo la compleja imaginación cervantina. Se pondrá un énfasis especial en la teoría literaria y linguística en la temprana  modernidad, sobre todo en los comentarios  italianos y españoles a la Poética de Aristóteles, y las polémicas humanísticas sobre la mimesis (la imitación y la problemática de captar y mediatizar la verdad por medio de un artificio representacional). Por otra parte, se tratará de la historia y recepción de las novellas y la prosa imaginativa en general en Europa durante los siglos XVI y XVII. Se llevarán a cabo lecturas atentas de las obras a leer para ver cómo Cervantes se enfrenta con el problema  de la representación de una realidad y verdad tambaleantes por medio del lenguaje y el papel que hace la imaginación en este proceso, acabando finalmente con la proclamación del mismo estatus ficticio de la ficción.

  • Section 003 – “Chilean Literature”  MWF 12:00-12:50PM in NCH 383  with Distinguished Visiting Professor Kemy Oyarzún (Professor Mané Lagos will temporarily manage the permission list.)

Literature and Culture in Contemporary Chilean Literature: will focus on questions of identity, memory and sexuality in a selected corpus of essays, poetry, novels and films. It will include works by Mercedes Valdivieso, José Donoso, Adolfo Couve, Raúl Zurita, Carmen Berenguer, Elvira Hernández, Elicura Chihuailaf and Diamelal Eltit. We will cover film productions by Miguel Littín and Patricio Guzmán, among others.

SPAN 4520 – Special Topics Culture & Civilization Seminar

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

  • Section 001 – “Sephardic Jews and Conversos”  MWF 11:00-11:50AM  in New CAB 395  with Alison Weber

Before 1492, Jews, although a small minority, played a significant role in the cultural life of Islamic and Christian Spain. After their expulsion from Spain in 1492 and from Portugal in 1497, the Sephardim traveled throughout the Mediterranean, north into Europe, across the oceans to the Americas, the Far East, and Africa, sometimes maintaining ties with or returning to the peninsula. This class will explore the history of the Sephardim and the Sephardic diaspora from the 13th century to the present (with an emphasis on the 14-17th centuries), addressing a number of issues: the origins of anti-Judaism, anti-Semitism, and racism; literary and visual representations of Jews; Conversos and the Spanish Inquisition; conversion, crypto-Judaism, and religious syncretism; the origins of religious tolerance; and the labile nature of religious and ethnic identities. The course, taught in Spanish, will be interdisciplinary—we will study legal, religious, literary, and historical documents and address theological, historical, ethical, anthropological, and aesthetic questions. A good reading knowledge of Spanish is essential. Several short papers and an original research paper. Non-Spanish majors may write their papers in English.

  • Section 002 – “Exile & Immigration in Latin America”  MW 3:00-4:15 in NCH 027  with Distinguished Visiting Professor Kemy Oyarzún (Professor Mané Lagos will temporarily manage the permission list.)

Study of nomadic identities and imaginary territories in Latin American cultural productions, contrasting 19th and 20th century representations in visual, oral and written forms, including Mexican and Southern Cone photographic and film production.

SPAN 4530 – Special Topics Language Seminar

Prerequisites:  SPAN 3010; AND SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200 or another course in Linguistics.

  • Section 001 – "Second Language Acquisition"  TuTh 11:00-12:15PM  in New CAB 291 with Emily Scida 

How do people learn a second language (L2)?  How are first language acquisition and second language acquisition different?  Why are some learners more successful than others in learning a second language?  How do we measure “success” in second language acquisition?  How do we define “competence”?  I invite you to join me in the exploration of these and other exciting questions.  Together we will discover the processes and mechanisms that drive language acquisition by studying how three different areas – linguistics, psychology, and sociocultural perspectives – have contributed to the major theories and ideas informing the field of Second Language Acquisition.

  • Section 002 – "Spanish vis-á-vis Other Romance Lanugages"  MoWe 2:00-3:15PM in New CAB 383 with Omar Velázquez-Mendoza 

Drawing on a comparative approach to language change, this course traces the primitive origins and historical development of the major linguistic changes taking place in the passage from Latin to Spanish and other Romance (i.e., Latin-derived) languages, mainly Portuguese, Italian, and French. Topics to be explored include: Expected and unexpected phonological changes in the neo-Latin language continuum; the role of analogy and ‘contamination’ in language change; etymological and non-etymological nasalization; the object + verb to verb + object shift; the prepositional direct object; pronominal replacement and duplication of direct and indirect objects.

  • Section 004 – "Second Language Acquisition"  TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in New CAB 291 with Emily Scida  

How do people learn a second language (L2)?  How are first language acquisition and second language acquisition different?  Why are some learners more successful than others in learning a second language?  How do we measure “success” in second language acquisition?  How do we define “competence”?  I invite you to join me in the exploration of these and other exciting questions.  Together we will discover the processes and mechanisms that drive language acquisition by studying how three different areas – linguistics, psychology, and sociocultural perspectives – have contributed to the major theories and ideas informing the field of Second Language Acquisition.

SPAN 4559 – New Course in Spanish "Translation II" 

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM  in New CAB 211  with Melissa Frost 

Prerequisite:SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.

SPAN 4559 es un curso diseñado para ser una continuación de SPAN 4040. En este curso los alumnos tendrán la oportunidad de ampliar su experiencia con la traducción literaria además de profundizar su conocimiento teórico relacionado a la traducción. A lo largo del semestre se traducirán textos de varios géneros literarios incluyendo cuento, novela, ensayo y poesía. Este semestre el enfoque será en grandes autores latinoamericanos del siglo XX. La meta de SPAN 4559 es de ayudar al alumno a entender su propio proceso como traductor y reflexionar sobre como cambia dicho proceso según el género literario y su familiaridad con autor y obra. Además, reflexionaremos sobre los contextos históricos, económicos, lingüísticos y políticos de los textos y cómo éstos afectan la traducción.

SPAN 4710 – Latin American Culture and Civilization 

MoWe 2:00-3:15PM  in Minor Hall 130  with Fernando Operé 

This course intends to acquaint the student with the history and culture of two countries in Latin America: Argentina and Mexico. We will start with pre-Columbian cultures, and the historical evolution from colonial times, the Independent period up to the present. Half of the course will be dedicated to study cultural and social topics: identity; race and ethnicity; city and countryside; artistic and music production; food and cuisine; fluctuations in the economy; religion and its many manifestations; and violence and resistance among others. The methodology is the consistent comparison of these two countries in the most important faces of their history and development.

SPAN 5750 -- Contemporary Spanish Literature

Th 3:30-6:00PM  in New CAB 036  with Andrew Anderson

In this core course we will study and analyze well-known texts from twentieth-century Spain drawn from the reading list for the qualifying exams. Over the course of the semester, we shall be looking at plays (texts by Valle-Inclán, García Lorca, and Buero Vallejo), poems (a broad selection of representative poems by a number of Spanish poets), novels (texts by Cela, Laforet, Martín Gaite and Mendoza), and essays (Ortega y Gasset).  The approach will be based essentially on close-reading, though attention will also be paid to the socio-historical context in which the works were composed and received.  Discussion/seminar format.

SPAN 5850 -- Spanish America: Modern Period

Mo 3:30-6:00PM  in New CAB 038  with Charlotte Rogers

This course is designed for graduate students in Spanish, and those from other departments with sufficient competency in the language to participate.  It aspires to comprehensively analyze many major texts of Spanish American literature of the Modern Period, as defined by our department’s MA program.  Beyond merely preparing students for examinations, this course also contextualizes contemporary Spanish American literature within broader discussions of literary history and theory.

SPAN 7100 -- Literary Theory

MoWe 2:00-3:15PM  in New CAB 415  with Gustavo Pellón

The last forty years have witnessed a veritable explosion of literary theory. As each new school of thought has arisen, it has challenged previous conception of the object and practice of literary studies. The course will undertake an examination of how the developments in literary theory have altered the definition of criticism. We will consider the major critical tendencies of the twentieth century, among them: formalism, myth criticism, structuralism, deconstruction, reader-response criticism, feminist criticism, new historicism, and post-colonial theory.

Written work will consist of a review of a theoretical text (25%), and a longer paper where you will apply a particular theoretical approach to the study of a Spanish or Spanish American literary text (50%).  Everyone will write a 250-word commentary on some aspect of the reading assignment for each class (25%).  These commentaries are an important part of your preparation and they should be available to you during class discussion.  The course will be conducted in English and Spanish.

Readings from:

LEITCH - NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF THEORY & CRITICISM – Second Edition, 2010.

And articles in Collab.

SPAN 7559 -- New Course in Spanish: Latin American Digital Humanities

Section 001 – “Latin American Digital Humanities”  TuTh 11:00-12:15  in Alderman Library 317  with Allison Bigelow & Rafael Alvarado

From the colonial period to the present day, the Popol Vuh, sometimes called the Maya book of creation, has been translated, edited, paraphrased, and glossed in more than 25 languages. WorldCat suggests that there are over 1,200 known editions of the work, published in verse (Christenson 2004), scholarly editions (Tedlock 1996, Christenson 2007), and illustrated volumes (Montejo and Garay 2012). In addition to differences in form and genre, Spanish-language volumes offer very different interpretations of the K’iche’ source text. The opening line of Adrián Recinos’s translation is, “Este es el principio de las antiguas historias de este lugar llamado Quiché,” while Emilio Abreu Gómez renders it as, “Entonces no había ni gente, ni animales, ni árboles, ni piedras, ni nada.” Readers’ interpretations of the text, and of Maya cultural and spiritual traditions conveyed in translation, thus depend upon the editions they consult, and these editions vary widely.

Thus, we propose to design a thematic research collection of the Popol Vuh, currently housed at the Newberry Library, and digitally hosted by the Ohio State University Library. By encoding the manuscript with tools that show the graphic and narrative complexity of the Popol Vuh, this project will allow readers to engage deeply with questions of historical, spiritual, and cultural translation. Such tools will ideally include images (glyphs, vases, figures from codices), maps, and clips from various editions of the work. Primary readings include translations and editions of the Popol Vuh; secondary sources will address key topics in Classic and Post-Classic Maya Studies (archaeology, art history, linguistics), as well as critical paradigms in DH scholarship (evaluation, methodology, pedagogy). On seminar days (Tuesdays, led by professor Bigelow), we will analyze primary and secondary readings and identify features we want to encode in our digital critical edition. How will we determine that? By reading the texts carefully, through the lens of historical/cultural translation, and thinking about their place as digital, public texts. On studio days (Thursdays, led by professor Alvarado), we will learn how to encode textual variants and graphic forms using Drupal software. How will we do that? Students will work in small teams (2-3 people) to encode a section of the manuscript (about 6 folios per person). In this way, you will build skills in literary/translation analysis and DH research, thinking critically about the problems that DH platforms do and do not resolve in Mesoamerican Studies.

This course is offered in the spring of 2017 so that students can present work at the 2018 DH conference in Mexico City, the first time that the conference will be held in Latin America.

SPAN 7559 -- New Course in Spanish: The Global South Imaginary

Section 002 – “The Global South Imaginary”  Th 3:30-6:00PM  in New CAB 111 with Anne-Garland Mahler

The “Global South”––referring both to a situational location that indexes spaces of inequity around the globe and a transnational political imaginary that results from a shared experience of the negative effects of globalization­­––has become a significant category of critical cultural analysis over the last ten years. While the term “Global South” has gained the most currency, many have described how contemporary capitalist globalization yields rescaled socio-spatial relations that produce new transnational political collectivities. Arjun Appadurai calls this trend “grassroots globalization” or “globalization from below;” Boaventura de Sousa Santos uses “subaltern cosmopolitanism” and “counter-hegemonic globalization;” Fernando Rosenberg refers to it as “alternative, southern cosmopolitanism,” and Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri describe it simply as “the multitude.”  This course will critically examine these “new” concepts, considering their deep roots within hemispheric American political thought and tracing the way these ideas attempt to respond to and depart from nationally-scaled comparative frameworks.  Questions driving this course will include: What is the Global South?  What are the ramifications of a Global South paradigm for literary and cultural production in our contemporary moment of globalization? What does a Global South reading look like? What might the Global South provide as an analytical filter that postcolonial or world-systems frameworks do not? What are potential pitfalls of this critical category and how might Global South scholarship avoid a totalizing category that veils local and internal inequities?

SPAN 8510 -- Seminar: Golden Age, "Eucharistic Discourse"

Tu 3:30-6:00PM  in New CAB 415  with Alison Weber

During the Middle Ages and early modern period, the Eucharist was a fertile ground for ways of thinking about the relations between the human and the divine, and between Christians and ethnic Others. The Eucharist continued to be a locus of intense cultural and ideological work in the early modern Spanish empire. The period witnessed, for example, a surge in stories, paintings, and sculpture depicting narratives of the profanation of hosts and of revenge miracles. Eucharistic enthusiasm, especially among unlettered women, became associated with heterodixy. The mystery of the Eucharist was celebrated in thousands of autos sacramentales, performed in the streets of major cities. While churchmen on the peninsula struggled to impart the distinction between orthodox and heterodox Eucharistic devotions, missionaries to the New World faced another challenge: teaching the distinction between indigenous practices of theophagy and Catholic transubstantiation.

This seminar will explore the textual and artistic responses to a doctrine perceived to be under siege, not only by Protestants without but by skeptics and ethnic minorities within. We will begin with the anti-Judaic poems of Gonzalo de Berceo, followed by arguably philo-protestant texts (Erasmus’s The Godly Feast; Montaigne’s “Of Cannibals,” and Lazarillo de Tormes). We will then explore the Eucharistic piety of female mystics. We will compare the Eucharistic poetry of Lope de Vega and Francisco de Quevedo with that of women poets like Luisa de Carvajal. We will continue with reading several autos sacramentales by Calderón de la Barca, Las Casas's Apologetica historia sumaria, Guaman Poma de Ayala’s Primera crónica, Lope de Vega’s “El Nuevo mundo de Cristobal Colón,” and Lope’s rewriting of the blood libel legend, “El niño inocente de la Guardia.” We will focus on these major questions: What can Eucharistic beliefs and practices tell us about the extent and limits of social discipline (the efforts of church and state to form obedient and docile citizens)? How did Moriscos, Conversos, and indigenous peoples challenge Eucharist doctrine? How is the Eucharist related to the need for “enemies” in times of reform and social crisis? What accounts for the extraordinary power of the Eucharist to evoke the tension between belief and skepticism, communitas and otherness, rebellion and submission? During three weeks of the course, the class will merge with an interdepartmental faculty/graduate Colloquium led by Dr. María Tausiet. Course requirements include active participation in class and in Collab discussion groups, short reaction papers, and a fifteen to twenty-page research paper.

SPAN 8550 -- Seminar: Colonial Period to 1900, "Hispanic Asianography” 

We 3:30-6:00PM  in New CAB 291  with Ricardo Padrón 

We are all familiar with the so-called "crónicas de Indias" which deal with Spain's experience in the New World.  In this course, we will examine similar texts written by Spaniards in Spanish about Spain's experience in the Pacific and Asia between 1513 and 1610, approximately.  We will examine what the Spanish meant by the "Indies" in light of various early modern "metageographies" and will learn how to read historical narrative for its spatial and geographical strategies.

Spanish in Translation (SPTR) Courses – Taught in English

SPTR 3402 – Don Quixote in English with Ricardo Padrón 

(This course requires enrollment in the lecture AND one discussion section.)

NOTE: SPAN majors and SPAN minors may count SPTR 3402 as either a 4000 literature course or a 4000-level elective. (You may only count one SPTR course toward your SPAN major or SPAN minor requirements.)

Lecture 100-LEC  

MoWe 2:00-3:15PM  in Claude Moore Nursing Educ Bldg G120 (Open to ALL)

  • Discussion 101-DIS  Th 5:00-5:50PM  in New CAB 364 (This section is for SPAN majors and minors only.)
  • Discussion 102-DIS  Fr 10:00-10:50AM  in Bryan 235 (This section is open to all, EXCEPT Spanish Majors & Minors.)
  • Discussion 103-DIS  Fr 11:00-11:50AM  in Gibson 141 (This section is for SPAN majors and minors only.)

Pre-requisites: None for students who want to do the work in English. All U.Va. students welcome. Students who want to do the work in Spanish should have taken at least one SPAN survey course (3400s) or its equivalent. NOTE: This course CAN be counted toward the Spanish major or minor.

In this class, we will read Miguel de Cervantes’s masterpiece Don Quixote de la Mancha in its entirety. We will try to figure out whether the protagonist is a hero, a fool, or a criminal.  We will see what the novel has to say about Spanish imperialism, the Renaissance, and the Reformation.  We will explore its concerns with pacifism, the role of women in society, and philosophical skepticism.  We will learn how the novel plays with us in many ways, including some that seem almost postmodern.  And we will discover what it has to say to us today about truth, authenticity, identity, love, friendship, and many other things that matter deeply.   

Students will be able to pick between reading and writing in English, and participating in an English-language discussion section, or reading and writing in Spanish, and participating in a Spanish-language discussion section.  There are no pre-requisites for the former.  In order to do the latter, you must have completed SPAN 3300 and at least one survey course (SPAN 3400s), and will be able to count the class as a 4000-level literature class or elective toward a Spanish major or minor. The course requires a midterm, a final, and a paper, as well as weekly comments on the readings and occasional quizzes.