Course Listing

Italian Spring 2018

Italian (ITAL) Courses – Taught in Italian

ITAL 1020 – Elementary Italian II

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Elementary Italian II is the second class in the four-course sequence that is necessary to complete the foreign language requirement. In this course, students will learn to narrate in all tenses of the indicative, express opinions, make hypotheses, and give orders. They will improve their writing skills by producing a number of original texts, including blog posts, essays, and articles. Students will also develop their ability to understand spoken Italian by listening to songs, commercials, and movie clips, and they will read and study song lyrics, newspaper headlines, poems, and some short stories. Students of Elementary Italian II will also have many occasions to learn more about life in contemporary Italy as they study the country’s language.

60% of this course will take place face to face during regularly scheduled class meetings on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, while 40% of the work must be completed online both through the Connect website and the students’ personal e-Portfolios.

ITAL 2020 – Intermediate Italian II

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

ITAL 2020 Intermediate Italian II is the fourth class in the four-course sequence which fulfills the language requirement. In this course, students will further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills as well as deepen their cultural literacy in Italian. You will accomplish these goals with the guidance of your instructor, through review of grammar, short readings, compositions, and listening and speaking activities. Students will also have the opportunity to listen to songs, comment on works of art, watch commercials and short films, read and write newspaper articles, analyze how the Italian language reflects the movement towards gender parity, and meet natives of Italy in your quest to become more confident and competent users of the Italian language.

Much like learning to play a sport or a musical instrument, studying a foreign language requires constant practice. Therefore, all course activities will be conducted in Italian.

ITAL 2030 – Intermediate Italian for Professionals with Sandro Puiatti

MoWeFr 1:00-1:50AM in New Cabell Hall 027

Intermediate Italian II for Professionals is the fourth class in the four-course sequence which fulfills the language requirement. In this course, students will further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills as well as deepen their cultural literacy in Italian. You will accomplish these goals with the guidance of your instructor, through review of grammar, short readings, compositions, and listening and speaking activities. Students will also have the opportunity to understand and appreciate Italian cultural practices in professional and commercial contexts, and to learn the specific listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills that are necessary in a professional environment.

This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice relative to real-world scenarios. Much like learning to play a sport or a musical instrument, studying a foreign language requires constant practice. Therefore, all course activities will be conducted in Italian.

ITAL 3020 – Advanced Italian II with Enrico Cesaretti

MoWeFr 12:00-12:50PM in Nau Hall 242

Prerequisite: ITAL 2020

ITAL 3020 - This course focuses on a selective review of Italian grammar and especially aims at boosting students' language skills. Emphasis will be on conversation, composition and vocabulary enrichment. 

ITAL 3720 – Novella (Italian Short Narrative) with Enrico Cesaretti

MoWeFr 11:00-11:50AM in Nau Hall 242

The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the long-standing and flexible genre of the Italian "novella" (short story) and to assess its continuous efficacy as a medium able to synthetically address a wide range of aesthetic, ethical, political and social-environmental issues. The course also aims at boosting students’ language skills and, therefore, requires extensive reading, discussing and writing in Italian.

 

Italian in Translation (ITTR) Courses – Taught in English

ITTR 2260 – Dante in Translation with Deborah Parker

MoWe 2:00-3:15PM in New Cabell Hall 042

T.S. Eliot wrote that “Dante and Shakespeare divide the world between them. There is no third.” We’ll pursue this bold statement through a close reading of the Inferno, the most intricate account of the afterlife ever written. This course will examine what makes this brilliant poem one of the acclaimed classics of western culture. We will explore the organization of Hell, its inhabitants, the nature of evil, Dante’s exile, and the rich tradition of visual material the poem has inspired from manuscript illustrations to Botticelli to more recent artists such as Gustave Doré and William Blake. Lectures will draw on The World of Dante (www.worldofdante.org) a multimedia site that offers a wide range of digital materials related to the Comedy.

ITTR 3680 (Cross-listed with WGS 3680) – Eve's Sinful Bite: Foodscapes in Women's Writing Culture and Society with Francesca Calamita

MoWeFr 11:00-11:50AM in Dell 2 101

This course explores how Italian women writers have represented food in their short stories, novels and autobiographies in dialogue with the culture and society from late nineteenth century to the present. Looking how cooking and serving meals to others, while denying themselves the pleasure of eating, are depicted in Italian women’s writing helps us understand the role food and food-related-activities have played, and still play, in women’s lives. These lectures will offer a close reading of the symbolic meaning of food in narrative and the way it intersects with Italian women’s socio-cultural history and the feminist movement, addressing issues of gender, identity and politics of the body.

ITTR 3960 – Mafiosi vs. Goodfellas: Organized Crime on Film in Italy & the USA with Sarah Annunziato

MoWeFr 1:00-1:50PM in Gibson Hall 141

Whether called “the mob,” “the Mafia,” “Camorra,” “’Ndrangheta,” or “Cosa Nostra,” organized crime has fascinated filmmakers in both Italy and the United States for decades.  But, how does each country’s cinematic tradition typically portray this phenomenon and its effects on law, politics, and the individual? Do the differing origins of organized crime in both nations influence the ways in which filmmakers depict it? How much do real-life law enforcement officials and mobsters influence films about organized crime in both countries?  How does audience reaction affect the portrayal? What effect do mob films have on the southern question in Italy, or on the perpetuation of stereotypes in the U.S.A.?

This course will examine these questions through a close-reading of films from both Italy and the United States. During the semester, students will become conversant with basic aspects of film theory and analysis, study the origins of organized crime in each nation, discuss the effects of this type of crime on Italy and the Italian diaspora in America, and examine the similarities and differences in the cinematic representations of this phenomenon in both countries.

 

Portuguese Spring 2018

Portuguese (PORT) Courses – Taught in Portuguese

PORT 2120 – Intermediate Intensive Portuguese with Lilian Feitosa

Prerequisite: Completion of FREN 2020 or SPAN 2020, or instructor permission.

  • Section 001 MoWeFr 11:00-11:50AM in New Cabell Hall 291
  • Section 002 MoWeFr 12:00-12:50PM in New Cabell Hall 211
  • Section 003 MoWeFr 1:00-1:50PM in New Cabell Hall 211

[From Course Catalog] Introduces speaking, understanding, reading and writing Portuguese, especially as used in Brazil. Five class hours and one laboratory hour. Followed by PORT 2120. 

POTR 4559 – New Course: Contemporary Brazilian Cinema with Eli Carter

MoWe 3:30-4:45PM in New Cabell Hall 056

The objective of this class is to provide a general overview of film production in Brazil since 1990. We will screen and discuss a variety of documentary and feature-length fiction films. Each of the films falls into at least one of five thematic categories: 1) the urban city 2) the underdeveloped countryside 3) identity 4) politics and 5) consumption. With these broader themes in mind, we will pay special attention to the films’ respective portrayals of violence, race, class, and sexuality, particularly as they unfold in a context increasingly marked by globalization and neoliberalism.

Spanish Spring 2018

Spanish (SPAN) Courses – Taught in Spanish

Undergraduate Courses

SPAN 1020 – Elementary Spanish

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites:  Passing grade in SPAN 1010. SPAN 1020 is for true beginners only. Students with prior experience with Spanish in high school must take the UVA Spanish placement exam. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by January 19 (MWF sections) and January 23 (TuTh sections).

Elementary Spanish (SPAN 1020) is a four-credit introductory level hybrid course for true beginners designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities on Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 1060 – Accelerated Elementary Spanish

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: Placement score of 420-510 on the SAT II Exam or a score of 0-325 on the UVA Placement Exam. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by January 19 (MWF sections) and January 23 (TuTh sections).

Accelerated Elementary Spanish a four-credit accelerated introductory level hybrid course designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities with Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2010 – Intermediate Spanish 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: SPAN 1020, SPAN 1060, or SAT II score of 520-590, or Placement Test score of 326-409. Students may not self-place in a language course.  All students will submit proof of placement by January 19 (MWF sections) and January 23 (TuTh sections).

Intermediate Spanish is a three-credit intermediate level course, the third course in a four-course sequence, which fulfills the language requirement.  The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2020 – Advanced Intermediate Spanish 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: Spanish 2010, SAT II Test score of 600-640, or UVA Placement Test score of 410-535. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by January 19 (MWF sections) and January 23 (TuTh sections).

Advanced Intermediate Spanish is a three credit intermediate level course, the fourth course in a four-course sequence which fulfills the language requirement. The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 3000 – Phonetics with Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in New CAB 207

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent.

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions will focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 3010 – Grammar and Composition I 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent); or UVA placement test score of 536-650; or AP score of 4; or SAT II score of 641-700; or IB Spanish (High) score of 7.

[From Course Catalog] This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the critical review, the persuasive essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3020 – Grammar and Composition II 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent) AND either of the following: a UVA placement test score of 651+; an AP score of 5; an SAT II score of 701-800; an IB Spanish A1 or A2 score of 5, 6 or 7.

[From Course Catalog] This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the comparative essay, the argumentative essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3030 – Cultural Conversations

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN3010 or the equivalent level of Spanish, in which case students will need to speak with the instructor ahead of time for permission to take the course.

[From Course Catalog] Conversation course devoted to different aspects of Spanish, Spanish American, or Latino culture. Student-led discussion of materials ranging from films and music videos to radio programs, newspapers, and the Internet.    

SPAN 3032 – Conversation Cinema – Spain with David Gies

TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in New Cabell Hall 303

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.

Oral interview with Professor Gies (dtg@virginia.edu) required for admission. This course uses current Spanish film as a basis for conversation; fluency, comprehension, grammar, accuracy, improvement in vocabulary, and pronunciation will be tracked (grade based on improvement).  Closed to native/heritage speakers and students who have had a conversation class.  Daily activities, vocabulary quizzes, one written paper, oral final exam. 

SPAN 3040 – Business Spanish 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 3050 – Spanish for Medical Professionals with Alicia Lopez Operé

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

[From Course Catalog] This course is designed for students planning to work in the health care field and who want to develop fundamental written and oral skills and vocabulary for the assessment of Spanish speaking patients in a variety of settings. Students will gain familiarity with non-technical and semi-technical functional vocabulary, along with idiomatic expressions and situational phrases that are used in medical Spanish.

  • Section 001  TuTh 9:30-10:45AM in New Cabell Hall 068  
  • Section 002  TuTh 11:00-12:15AM in Nau Hall 141   

SPAN 3300 – Texts and Interpretation 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement. (Note: SPAN 3300 or instructor permission is prerequisite for any course in Spanish literature or culture with a number above SPAN 3300.)

In this course we will be covering a variety of basic approaches to literary texts that enable us to analyze and understand them better. The course will be organized on the basis of literary genre (narrative, theater, poetry, etc.), with a portion of the semester dedicated to each. Short texts in Spanish for readings will be drawn from both Spanish and Latin American literature, and from a range of time periods.

SPAN 3400 – Survey of Spanish Literature I (Middle Ages to 1700) with Ricardo Padrón

MoWeFr 2:00-2:50PM in New Cabell Hall 338

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

This course covers the history of Spanish literature from its medieval origins through the year 1700, covering such indispensable classics as the Poema de Mío Çid, Don Quixote, the poetry of Garcilaso de la Vega, the theater of Calderón, and others. We will spend some time on the historical and cultural context of each of these texts, but emphasis will fall upon reading and understanding the texts themselves. Pre-Requisite: SPAN 3300, Texts & Interpretations, or departmental placement.

SPAN 3430 – Survey of Latin American Literature II (1900 to Present)

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement.

  • Section 001  TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in New Cabell Hall 383 with María-Inés Lagos

Este curso ofrecerá una visión panorámica de las principales corrientes literarias hispanoamericanas desde fines del siglo XIX hasta el presente. Al analizar y estudiar las obras tendremos en cuenta no solo la tradición literaria sino también el contexto socio histórico necesario para entender el trasfondo cultural al que se refieren las obras. Leeremos cuentos, ensayos, poemas y una novela corta, y utilizaremos materiales audiovisuales  sobre temas relacionados con las obras o el periodo estudiados. La clase estará dedicada al análisis de los textos, de los materiales audiovisuales asignados y a aprender de las circunstancias históricas, sociales y culturales de las que emergen las obras literarias. Es muy importante preparar las lecturas antes de la clase. La responsabilidad de participar en las discusiones de clase depende del estudiante. Quizzes, 2 pruebas, ensayos y tareas.  

Advertencia importante: este es un curso interactivo en el que los estudiantes deben leer los textos asignados para cada clase y participar en las actividades. Habrá un quiz al comienzo de cada clase. 

Textos:

Huellas de las literaturas hispanoamericanas. Second Edition. J. F. Garganigo, editor. Este libro se puede comprar por internet y habrá un ejemplar en la reserva de Clemons (3 horas).  

No pasó nada, novela corta de Antonio Skármeta.

  • Section 002  MoWeFr 12:00-12:50PM in New Cabell Hall 338 with Charlotte Rogers

This course is a survey of Modern Spanish American literature to introduce students to major authors, works, and literary movements of Spanish America from 1900 to the present. Students will read poetry, essays and short prose selections as well as a novel. Class participation and attendance, papers, exams and other assignments.

SPAN 4040 – Translation from Spanish to English 

Check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 4203 – Structure of Spanish with Joel Rini

MoWe 2:00-3:15PM in New Cabell Hall 332

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 (or equivalent) and SPAN 3000; or SPAN 3010 (or equivalent) and 3200

This is an advanced introduction to the study of the fundamental structures of the grammatical system of the Spanish language. The course will analyze present-day structures of the language as well as the linguistic processes and changes involved in the development of those structures. Prior coursework in linguistics is expected.

SPAN 4210 – History of the Spanish Language II with Omar Velázquez-Mendoza 

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in New Cabell Hall 207

Prerequisite:  SPAN 3010 (or equivalent) and SPAN 3000; or SPAN 3010 (or equivalent) and 3200

This course traces the historical development of the Spanish language from its origins as a spoken Latin variety to the present. Topics include: The relationship between language change and language variation; the Indo-European language family; Romanization of the Iberian Peninsula; Classical vs. 'Vulgar' Latin; Visigothic and Arab influence on the Spanish language; expected and unexpected outcomes of nasalization; Latin and Medieval Spanish word order; Golden Age and Judeo-Spanish; Colonial Spanish. Conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 4401 – Spanish Literature of the Golden Age with E. Michael Gerli

TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in New Cabell Hall 332

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300 and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

(Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Spanish literature requirement -- SPAN 3400 or 3410.)

Readings from representative literary genres of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries: poetry, theater, prose narrative. The class is taught from the perspective of the `history of ideas' and emphasizes the role of the Spanish cultural, political, and religious environment of the period in adapting the major ideas of European Thought to a Hispanic context. Emphasis will also be given to theoretical literary aspects of the works we read, particularly the positioning and definition of the human subject in the texts.

SPAN 4402 – Don Quixote with Ricardo Padrón

MoWeFr 12:00-12:50AM in New Cabell Hall 315

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300 and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

(Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Spanish literature requirement -- SPAN 3400 or 3410.)

In this class, we will read Cervantes’s masterpiece almost in its entirety, in Spanish. We will try to figure out whether the protagonist is a hero, a fool, or a criminal.  We will see what the novel has to say about Spanish imperialism, the Renaissance, and the Reformation.  We will explore its concerns with pacifism, the role of women in society, and philosophical skepticism.  We will learn how the novel plays with us in many ways, including some that seem almost postmodern.  And we will discover what it has to say to us today about truth, authenticity, identity, love, friendship, and many other things that matter deeply.

SPAN 4500 – Special Topics Literature Seminar: “Afro-Latinidad” with Anne-Garland Mahler

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in New Cabell Hall 303

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

(Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Latin American literature requirement -- SPAN 3420 or 3430.)

This course is a survey of the history and literature of the African diaspora in Latin America from the Caribbean, Mexico, and the Río de la Plata to the “Latin American” cities of New York and Miami. From the earliest days of Spanish colonization to fighting in the wars of independence to forging global political and cultural networks from the early cold war to present-day, African-descended peoples have had an undeniably central role in defining Latin America’s history and its present. Yet Afro-Latin American experiences and literatures are often made invisible in mainstream media and scholarship. In this course, we will engage a wide array of texts and films on the experiences of peoples of African descent in Latin America, ranging from narratives about black conquistadors to testimonies of runaway slaves to Afro-Latin@ contributions to the origins of hip-hop in the United States. The primary objectives of this course are to expose students to both texts produced by and about Afro-Latin Americans and to the social and historical context in which those texts were produced, as well as to assist students in further developing their critical writing and speaking skills in Spanish.

SPAN 4520 – Special Topics Culture & Civilization Seminar: “The World of Cervantes” with Ricardo Padrón  [Course CANCELLED]

This course has been CANCELLED and will NOT be offered in Spring 2018.

SPAN 4530 – Special Topics Language Seminar:

  • Section 001 “Second Language Acquisition”  TuTh 11:00-12:15PM in New Cabell Hall 315 with Emily Scida

    Prerequisites: SPAN 3010; AND SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200 or another course in Linguistics.

How do people learn a second language (L2)?  How are first language acquisition and second language acquisition different?  Why are some learners more successful than others in learning a second language?  How do we measure “success” in second language acquisition?  How do we define “competence”?  I invite you to join me in the exploration of these and other exciting questions.  Together we will discover the processes and mechanisms that drive language acquisition by studying how various disciplines have contributed to the major theories and ideas informing the field of Second Language Acquisition.

  • Section 003 “Spanish to English Translation II” TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in New Cabell Hall 395 with Melissa Frost

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

Span 4700 – Spanish Culture and Civilization with Fernando Operé

MoWe 2:00-3:15PM in Maury Hall 115

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300 and one of the following: SPAN 3400, 3410, 3420 or 3430 or departmental consent.

This course deals with Spain in the 20th and 21st centuries.  It will begin with the most important political events since 1900 (end of the Monarchy of Alfonso XIII, the 2nd Republic, Spanish Civil War, Franco Dictatorship), up to the present political events of modern Spain ruled by a parliament under a monarchy, and integrated into the European Community.  Special emphasis will be put in understanding Spain in its complexity, social composition and decomposition, fiestas, and the main social changes of the Spanish society after the death of Franco in 1975 (immigration, nationalism).  Part of the course will be dedicated to the study of the Spanish artistic movements and its most relevant contemporary representatives in the field of music (flamenco and popular), painting (Dalí, Picasso, Sorolla), architecture (Gaudí, Calatrava), dance.

Span 4704 – Islamic Iberia with E. Michael Gerli  [Course CANCELLED]

This course has been CANCELLED and will NOT be offered in Spring 2018.

Span 4710 – Latin American Culture and Civilization with Fernando Operé

MoWe 3:30-4:45PM in New Cabell Hall 207

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

This course intends to acquaint the student with the history and culture of two important countries in Latin America: Argentina and Mexico. We will start with pre-Columbian cultures, and the historical evolution from colonial times, the Independent period up to the present. Half of the course will be dedicated to study cultural and social topics: identity; race and ethnicity; city and countryside; artistic and music production; food and cuisine; fluctuations in the economy; religion and its many manifestations; and violence and resistance among others. The methodology is the consistent comparison of these two countries in the most important faces of their history and development.

Spanish Spring 2018

Graduate Courses

SPAN 5300 – Middle Ages and Early Renaissance with E. Michael Gerli

Th 3:30-6:00PM in New Cabell 411

The course will deal with the “canonical” works of the Iberian Middle Ages and the early, early modern period. It will seek to provide an overview of current thinking regarding their nature and origin, while at the same time seeking to interrogate many of the prevailing assumptions and received ideas of Spanish literary historiography and, indeed, literary history itself. Works and topics to be addressed are: literacy and orality; manuscript culture and textual transmission; the medieval Iberian lyric in its Pan-European context plus its problematic connection to Arabic muwashshaat (i.e., the kharjas); the Castilian epic, especially the Poema de Mio Cid, in relation to the Romance epic in general; clerical poetry and the rise of literacy (Berceo, the so-called mester de clerecía, and the Libro de buen amor); the institutional rise and uses of vernacular prose (Alfonso X and the discourses of cultural authority: historiography, law, and science); the advent of imaginative prose and the class interests of the aristocracy (Don Juan Manuel and El conde Lucanor); medieval quest, sentimental, and etiological romances (Libro del cavallero Zifar, Cárcel de Amor); and, finally, humanistic comedy (Celestina) and courtly culture.

Course Requirements: Two papers (10-15 pp. each).

SPAN 7840 – Spanish-American Fiction with María-Inés Lagos

Th 3:30-6:00PM in New Cabell Hall 038

This course will present a panorama of contemporary Spanish American literature’s main trends through the study of novellas published between 1935 and the present. These texts raise issues related to literature and writing, as well as gender and family relations, the interaction between individual subjects and society, evoke political and social conditions, and follow the various literary developments of their era. Authors include María Luisa Bombal (La última niebla), Juan Carlos Onetti (El pozo), Julio Cortázar (El perseguidor), Felisberto Hernández (Las hortensias), Carlos Fuentes (Aura), Clarice Lispector (La hora de la estrella) Gabriel García Márquez (Crónica de una muerte anunciada), Elena Poniatowska (Querido Diego), Mario Vargas Llosa (Los cachorros), Luisa Valenzuela (“Cuarta versión” and “Cambio de armas”), Diamela Eltit (Los vigilantes), Senel Paz (El lobo, el bosque y el hombre nuevo), Antonio Skármeta (No pasó nada), César Aira (Cómo me hice monja), Mario Bellatin (Salón de belleza), Horacio Castellanos Moya (Insensatez) among others. We will also watch some films on related topics and read theoretical essays. Class participation, critique and presentation of an article, research paper and peer review of a classmate’s paper.

SPAN 7850 – Themes and Genres “Larra's World” with David Gies

We 3:30-6:00PM in New Cabell Hall 283

This class, taught in Spanish, will be a doctoral seminar focused on the complete works (articles) of Mariano José de Larra (1809-1837), Spain's best-known nineteenth-century journalist. We will read all of his published articles, which cover wide areas of costumbrismo and social commentary, political satire, theatrical criticism, and personal revelation. Students will use the Crítica edition (ed. Alejandro Pérez Vidal) and will access all of the rest of the articles in Collab. Supplementary readings, weekly presentations, and a final paper.

SPAN 8540 –Seminars: Modern Spanish Literature “Lorca, Dalí, Buñuel” with Andrew Anderson

Tu 3:30-6:00PM in New Cabell 064

This seminar will be concerned primarily with the decade 1920-30 when Federico García Lorca, Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel became close friends.  We will study a range of cultural activities, literary texts, paintings, films, etc. whose immediate context is provided by these friendships.  Starting with the Residencia de Estudiantes as the primary locus of these encounters, we will consider student activities at the “Resi” (e.g. production of Don Juan Tenorio), the literary avant-garde, Lorca’s literary output most influenced by Dalí and Buñuel (e.g. “Oda a Salvador Dalí”, Poemas en prosa), Lorca’s drawings, Lorca’s lectures, Dalí’s cubist and surrealist paintings, Dalí’s poems and prose poems, Buñuel’s plays, poems and prose poems, Buñuel and Dalí’s early films (Un chien andalou, L’Âge d’or), and much more.  Seminar participation and end-of-semester research paper.

K’iche’ Spring 2018

Maya K’iché (KICH) Courses – Taught in K’iché

KICH 1020 – Introduction to Maya K’iché II on TuTh 4:00-5:15PM in Clemons Library 320 with M. Esther Poveda Moreno

The second part of a year-long sequence that introduces students to Maya K’iche’, this course focuses on three main areas: K’iche’ language, Maya linguistics, and Maya culture. The language and linguistics elements of the course will allow students to learn and understand complex relationships – the relationship of sound to syntax, of language to literature – in an entirely new cultural context and content area, building from their knowledge of K’iche’ I to expand and enrich their studies. Students will thus learn how to apply their work in other classes, especially linguistics, anthropology, Spanish, and Latin American studies, to a new body of content, recognizing how their study of other languages, literary forms, and issues in global development can enhance their study of K’iche’, and how to communicate those insights through the target language.

KICH 2020 – Intermediate Maya K’iché II on TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in in Clemons Library 320 with M. Esther Poveda Moreno

As the Maya K'iche' capstone course in the Duke-UVa-Vanderbilt consortium for the teaching of less commonly taught languages, this class asks students to apply their introductory study of grammar to original research with primary and secondary sources, print and oral alike. Having studied the difference between colonial-era and contemporary orthographies in KICH 2010, students will now work with primary sources and different translations of K’iche’ texts; for example, they might compare Dennis Tedlock’s translation of the Popol Vuh with and Allen Christenson’s more recent work, or they might choose to write their final essay on the work of contemporary poet Sam Colop. By collaborating with the Vanderbilt-based instructor of K’iche’, students will identify a research topic that reflects their larger academic and professional interests, learning how to integrate their work in other classes, especially linguistics, anthropology, comparative literature, Spanish, and Latin American studies, to their study of K’iche’. This capstone course will also ask that they recognize how their study of other languages, literary forms, and issues in global development can enhance their study of K’iche’, and how to communicate those insights through the target language.