Spanish Undergraduate Spring 2019

Spanish (SPAN) Courses – Taught in Spanish

SPAN 1020 – Elementary Spanish

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites:  Passing grade in SPAN 1010. SPAN 1020 is for true beginners only. Students with prior experience with Spanish in high school must take the UVA Spanish placement exam. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by TBA (MWF sections) and TBA (TuTh sections).

Elementary Spanish (SPAN 1020) is a four-credit introductory level hybrid course for true beginners designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities on Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 1060 – Accelerated Elementary Spanish

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: Placement score of 420-510 on the SAT II Exam or a score of 0-325 on the UVA Placement Exam. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by TBA (MWF sections) and TBA (TuTh sections).

Accelerated Elementary Spanish a four-credit accelerated introductory level hybrid course designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a technology-enhanced language course in which students will complete online activities with Connect on Tuesdays and Thursdays instead of attending class all five days of the week.  Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework 5 days a week, plus an extra hour of work that substitutes for class time each on Tuesday/ Thursday. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2010 – Intermediate Spanish 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: SPAN 1020, SPAN 1060, or SAT II score of 520-590, or Placement Test score of 326-409. Students may not self-place in a language course.  All students will submit proof of placement by TBA (MWF sections) and TBA (TuTh sections).

Intermediate Spanish is a three-credit intermediate level course, the third course in a four-course sequence, which fulfills the language requirement.  The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 2020 – Advanced Intermediate Spanish 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: Spanish 2010, SAT II Test score of 600-640, or UVA Placement Test score of 410-535. Students may not self-place in a language course. All students will submit proof of placement by TBA (MWF sections) and TBA (TuTh sections).

Advanced Intermediate Spanish is a three credit intermediate level course, the fourth course in a four-course sequence which fulfills the language requirement. The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between elementary and advanced levels in the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is a flipped class, which means that students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only.

SPAN 3000 – Phonetics with Omar Velázquez-Mendoza and David Korfhagen

  • Section 001 MoWe 3:30-4:45PM in New Cabell Hall 107 with Omar Velázquez-Mendoza
  • Section 002 MoWeFr 12:00-12:50PM in Nau Hall 241 with David Korfhagen

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent.

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the students’ pronunciation. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 3010 – Grammar and Composition I

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent); or UVA placement test score of 536-650; or AP score of 4; or SAT II score of 641-700; or IB Spanish (High) score of 7.

This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the critical review, the persuasive essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3020 – Grammar and Composition II 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisites: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent) AND either of the following: a UVA placement test score of 651+; an AP score of 5; an SAT II score of 701-800; an IB Spanish A1 or A2 score of 5, 6 or 7.

This course seeks to develop advanced literacy in Spanish through extensive reading, writing, analysis, and discussion of authentic literary texts and videos. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure expected in the following academic genres: the comparative essay, the argumentative essay, and the research paper.

SPAN 3030 – Cultural Conversations

TuTh 3:30-4:45PM in New Cabell Hall 489 with Loreto Romero Martinez Eiroa

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

Conversation course devoted to different aspects of Spanish, Spanish American, or Latino culture. Student-led discussion of materials ranging from films and music videos to radio programs, newspapers, and the Internet.    

SPAN 3040 – Business Spanish 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 3050 – Spanish for Medical Professionals with Alicia Lopez Operé

MoWeFr 11:00-11:50AM in Dell 1 104

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

This course is designed for students planning to work in the health care field and who want to develop fundamental written and oral skills and vocabulary for the assessment of Spanish speaking patients in a variety of settings. Students will gain familiarity with non-technical and semi-technical functional vocabulary, along with idiomatic expressions and situational phrases that are used in medical Spanish.

SPAN 3200 – Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics with Emily Scida

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement

  • Section 001 TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in New Cabell Hall 315
  • Section 002 TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM in New Cabell Hall 183

In this course we will explore various areas of linguistics as they relate to the study of the Spanish language, including: the sound system (phonetics and phonology), word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), language change (historical linguistics), linguistic variation (dialectology), meaning (semantics), and language learning (second language acquisition). Through course readings and assignments, students will learn to apply linguistic analysis to the study of language and understand how research in linguistics informs what we know about language. Coursework will include weekly writing assignments, six quizzes, a digital research project, and a final exam. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 3300 – Texts and Interpretation 

Please check SIS for sections, dates, times, locations, and instructors.

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement. (Note: SPAN 3300 or instructor permission is prerequisite for any course in Spanish literature or culture with a number above SPAN 3300.)

In this course we will be covering a variety of basic approaches to literary texts that enable us to analyze and understand them better. The course will be organized on the basis of literary genre (narrative, theater, poetry, etc.), with a portion of the semester dedicated to each. Short texts in Spanish for readings will be drawn from both Spanish and Latin American literature, and from a range of time periods.

SPAN 3400 – Survey of Spanish Literature I (Middle Ages to 1700) with Crystal Chemris

MoWeFr 1:00-1:50PM in New Cabell Hall 338

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

In this introduction to Spanish Literature of the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Baroque, selections of literary classics will be studied in their historical and aesthetic context, highlighting in particular the importance of the mixture of Jewish, Islamic and Christian cultures. Topics such as gender, alterity, artistic experimentation, and social critique will be explored as the course progresses, offering students a foundation in the cultural production of Spain's early periods which continues to impact Hispanic literature today.

SPAN 3410 – Survey of Spanish Literature II (1700 to Present) with Samuel Amago

MoWeFr 12:00-12:50PM in New Cabell Hall 338

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

This course for advanced undergraduates represents a panoramic survey of the last two hundred years of Spanish peninsular culture. Over the course of the semester, we will explore representative literary movements of modern Spain, including Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, the Avant Garde, Modernism, and Postmodernism in terms of their historical, intellectual, artistic and cultural contexts.

SPAN 3430 – Survey of Latin American Literature II (1900 to Present) with Anne Garland Mahler

TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in New Cabell Hall 338

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement.

Spanish 3430 provides students with a survey of Latin American literature and the context in which it has developed from 1900 to the present. Students will leave this course with a general understanding of the region’s major literary trends, including their social and political dimensions. “Literature,” in this course, refers to a wide range of cultural production from literary texts (novels, stories, essays, poems) to visual art, film, and song lyrics. Throughout the course, we will consider the following questions: How has Latin America’s cultural production shaped and been shaped by its cultures, peoples, and historical events? How do the consciousness, memory, and imagination expressed within the region’s literature both reflect and create the region’s realities? And perhaps most importantly, who has (and has not) had access to Latin America’s literature and how has that shaped the way the region has represented itself through both the written word and image?

SPAN 4040 – Translation from Spanish to English 

MoWe 2:00-3:15PM in Shannon House 109 with Alexa Jeffress

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 4200 – History of the Language with Joel Rini

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in New Cabell Hall 027

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 and 3010, or 3000 and 3010, or departmental placement.

Please direct inquiries to the instructor.

SPAN 4202 – Hispanic Sociolinguistics with Omar Velázquez-Mendoza 

MoWe 2:00-3:15PM in New Cabell Hall 383

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 and 3010, or 3000 and 3010, or departmental placement.

This course examines the Spanish language within its social context by exploring—among others—the following topics: 1) language versus dialect; 2) the standard language; 3) linguistic variation and its main variables: geography, style, gender, age, etc.; 4) grammaticalization as a social process; 5) language variation and language change; 6) language contact and biligualism; 7) Spanish in the US. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 4310 – Latin American Women Writers from 1900 to the Present with María-Inés Lagos

TuTh 12:30-1:45PM in New Cabell Hall 383

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.

Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Latin American literature requirement -- SPAN 3420 or SPAN 3430.

Study of major Latin American women writers from 1900 to the present—poets, essayists, playwrights, and fiction writers. We will read works by authors of various generations and countries as well as essays on gender theory. Discussion will focus on the literary representation of issues related to gender and culture, and their intersection with other variables, such as class, race, historical period, etc. Emphasis on how women from different backgrounds have articulated female experience in societies that establish strong differences between the roles of men and women. Films and other audiovisual materials will be used to illustrate the social and cultural context. Class participation, oral presentation, two exams, several short essays, one research paper.

SPAN 4320 – Contemporary Latin-American Short Fiction with María-Inés Lagos

TuTh 12:00-12:50AM in New Cabell Hall 383

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300 and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Latin American literature requirement -- SPAN 3420 or SPAN 3430.

We will explore the great variety of the short story in Spanish America during the 20th and 21st century. Starting with Baldomero Lillo’s stories about life in the coal mines in Southern Chile at the turn of the 20th century, we will read short stories addressing a multiplicity of themes (family relationships, the workings of power and politics, love relationships, friendships, the intersection of social, political, gender, class and race issues, etc.) taking into account the socio historical context. Among the authors we will include Horacio Quiroga, María Luisa Bombal, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Julio Cortázar, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes, José Donoso, Elena Poniatowska, Luisa Valenzuela, Rosario Ferré, Liliana Heker, Ana María Shua, Roberto Bolaño, Cristina Peri Rossi, and a group of young writers born in the 1970s and 80s. We will also watch films and documentaries that will help us to better understand the socio historical background. Class participation, 2 exams, quizzes and written assignments, and one research paper.

SPAN 4500 – Special Topics Literature Seminars with Anne-Garland Mahler and Andrew Anderson

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

  • Section 001 “Afro-Latinidad”  TuTh 2:00-3:15PM in New Cabell Hall 191 with Anne-Garland Mahler

Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Latin American literature requirement -- SPAN 3420 or SPAN 3430.

This course is a survey of the history and literature of the African diaspora in Latin America from the Caribbean, Mexico, and the Río de la Plata to the “Latin American” cities of New York and Miami. From the earliest days of Spanish colonization to fighting in the wars of independence to forging global political and cultural networks from the early twentieth century to present-day, African-descended peoples have had an undeniably central role in defining Latin America’s history and its present. Yet Afro-Latin American experiences and literatures are often occluded in mainstream media and scholarship.  In this course, we will engage a wide array of texts and films on the experiences of peoples of African descent in Latin America, ranging from narratives about black conquistadors to testimonies of runaway slaves to Afro-Latin@ contributions to the origins of hip-hop in the United States. The primary objectives of this course are to expose students to both texts produced by and about Afro-Latin Americans and to the social and historical context in which those texts were produced, as well as to assist students in further developing their critical writing and speaking skills in Spanish.

  • Section 003 “Modern Spanish Theatre”  MoWeFr 2:00-2:50PM in New Cabell Hall 395 with Andrew Anderson

Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Spanish literature requirement -- SPAN 3410.

We will study selected plays by Ramón del Valle-Inclán, Federico García Lorca, and Antonio Buero Vallejo.  Through close readings we will seek to understand what the plays are about and how they explore and communicate their themes, and also what challenges they presented for their staging.  In one or other way, thematically or technically, they all deviate from the stylistic norms of “realist” theatre current at the time.  Discussion/seminar format.

SPAN 4621 – Latin American Women Poets with Gustavo Pellón

TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM in New Cabell Hall 168

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

Note: Spanish majors who are prohibited from taking survey of literature courses may use this class as a substitute for the survey of Latin American literature requirement -- SPAN 3420 or SPAN 3430.

In this course we will read extensively from the poetry of the three most famous women poets of Latin America in the twentieth century: Uruguay’s Delmira Agustini, Argentina’s Alfonsina Storni, and Chile’s Gabriela Mistral, the first Latin American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. 

Texts:

Delmira Agustini.  Poesía completas.  Cátedra.

Alfonsina Storni.  Antología poética.  Losada.

Gabriela Mistral.  Desolación, Ternura, Tala, Lagar.  Porrúa.

Span 4704 – Islamic Ibeia with E. Michael Gerli

TuTh12:30-1:45AM in New Cabell Hall 485

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.

The course offers an introduction to Islam and a cultural history of al- Andalus (Islamic Iberia) from 711 until the expulsion of the Morsicos from early modern Spain in 1609. Lectures, videos, and oral reports will concentrate on several major moments: The rise of the Emirate/Caliphate of Córdoba and Islamic hegemony in the peninsula; fragmentation of the Caliphate and cultural splendor of the ta’ifa (pl. tawa’if) kingdoms in the eleventh century; the advent of Moslem fundamentalism from the Maghrib in the eleventh and twelfth centuries; the phenomenon of mudejarismo after the Christian conquest of Seville and Córdoba in the mid-thirteenth century; the contradictions posed by Islam in Granada, a client state of Castile during most of its history, after the decline of Islam in the rest of the peninsula (1250-1492); and the problems created by the presence of Islamic culture in a Christian state during the sixteenth-century.

Span 4710 – Latin American Culture and Civilization with Fernando Operé

MoWe 3:30-4:45PM in Wilson Hall 214

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

This course intends to acquaint the student with the history and culture of two important countries in Latin America: Argentina and Mexico. We will start with pre-Columbian cultures, and the historical evolution from colonial times, the Independent period up to the present. The second part of the course will be dedicated to study cultural and social topics: identity; race and ethnicity; city and countryside; artistic and music production; food and cuisine; fluctuations in the economy; religion and its many manifestations; and violence and resistance among others. The methodology is the consistent comparison of these two countries in the most important faces of their history and development.

Spring
2019
Undergraduate Courses
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